European Journal of Epidemiology

, 23:475

Passive smoking, cytochrome P450 gene polymorphisms and dysmenorrhea

Authors

  • Lou Lei
    • Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public HealthPeking University Health Science Center
  • Linan Ye
    • Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public HealthPeking University Health Science Center
  • Hong Liu
    • Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public HealthPeking University Health Science Center
  • Changzhong Chen
    • Brigham and Women’s hospitalHarvard Medical School
  • Zhian Fang
    • Anhui Biomedical Institute
  • Lihua Wang
    • Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public HealthPeking University Health Science Center
  • Yonghua Hu
    • Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public HealthPeking University Health Science Center
    • Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public HealthPeking University Health Science Center
GENETIC EPIDEMIOLOGY

DOI: 10.1007/s10654-008-9250-6

Cite this article as:
Lei, L., Ye, L., Liu, H. et al. Eur J Epidemiol (2008) 23: 475. doi:10.1007/s10654-008-9250-6
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Abstract

Purpose This study investigated whether the association between passive smoking exposure and dysmenorrhea is modified by two susceptibility genes, CYP1A1MspI and CYP1A1HincII. Methods This report includes 1,645 (1,124 no dysmenorrhea, 521 dysmenorrhea) non-smoking and non-drinking newly wedding female workers at Anqing, China between June 1997 and June 2000. Multiple logistic regression models were used to estimate the associations of passive smoking exposure and genetic susceptibility with dysmenorrhea, adjusting for maternal age, BMI, age of menarche, education, vibration exposure, shift work, noise exposure, pregnancy history, perceived stress and physical laboring stress. Results In the passive smoking group, women who have C/C6235 genotype (OR = 1.8, 95% CI = 1.0–3.3) in CYP1A1MspI and Ile/Ile462 genotype (OR = 2.9, 95% CI = 1.1–7.7) in CYP1A1HincII was associated with an increased risk of dysmenorrhea. When stratified by women genotype, the adjusted OR of dysmenorrheal was 1.6 (95% CI = 1.2–2.1) for passive smoking group with Ile/Ile462 genotype, and 1.5 (95% CI = 1.0–2.1) with C/C6235 genotype, compared to non-passive smoking group, respectively. The data further showed that there was a significant combined effect between passive smoking and the CYP1A1 Msp1C/C6235 (OR = 1.5, 95% CI = 1.0–2.1), and HincII Ile/Ile462 (OR = 1.6, 95% CI = 1.2–2.1), respectively. Conclusion CYP1A1 MspI and HincII genotypes modified the association between passive smoking and dysmenorrhea.

Keywords

Cytochrome P450DysmenorrheaPolymorphismGeneticPassive smoke

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2008