Early Childhood Education Journal

, Volume 44, Issue 2, pp 127–134

Singaporean Parents’ Views of Their Young Children’s Access and Use of Technological Devices

  • Marjory Ebbeck
  • Hoi Yin Bonnie Yim
  • Yvonne Chan
  • Mandy Goh
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10643-015-0695-4

Cite this article as:
Ebbeck, M., Yim, H.Y.B., Chan, Y. et al. Early Childhood Educ J (2016) 44: 127. doi:10.1007/s10643-015-0695-4

Abstract

Debates continue about the access young children have to technological devices, given the increasingly accessible and available technology in most developed countries. Concerns have been expressed by parents/caregivers and researchers, and questions have been raised about possible risks and benefits of these devices on young children who, in some instances, may be accessing these devices daily. Levin (2013) states that it is as if children are being remote controlled by the scripts of others (television, videos, electronic toys) which undermine children’s abilities to create their own learning scripts. This study investigated 1,058 parents’/caregivers’ views of their children’s (aged below 7 years) access and time spent on technology devices. Parents’/caregivers’ views on risks and benefits associated with the use of the emerging touch screen devices were also sought. The context for this research was Singapore which, according to a survey in 2012 by Ericsson, has one of the highest usage rates of smartphones and touchscreen devices in the world. The findings may help researchers, parents/caregivers and teachers to further their understanding of young children’s development in the twenty-first century.

Keywords

Touch screens Parents Singapore Children 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marjory Ebbeck
    • 1
  • Hoi Yin Bonnie Yim
    • 2
  • Yvonne Chan
    • 3
  • Mandy Goh
    • 3
  1. 1.School of EducationUniversity of South Australia, Magill CampusMagillAustralia
  2. 2.School of EducationDeakin University, Geelong Waurn Ponds CampusGeelongAustralia
  3. 3.SEED Institute, Devan Nair Institute for Employment and EmployabilitySingaporeSingapore

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