Environmental Biology of Fishes

, Volume 85, Issue 3, pp 253–264

Variability in migration timing of adult Pacific lamprey (Lampetra tridentata) in the Columbia River, U.S.A.

Authors

    • Idaho Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, Department of Fish and Wildlife ResourcesUniversity of Idaho
  • Mary. L. Moser
    • Northwest Fisheries Science CenterNational Marine Fisheries Service
  • Charles T. Boggs
    • Idaho Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, Department of Fish and Wildlife ResourcesUniversity of Idaho
  • William R. Daigle
    • Idaho Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, Department of Fish and Wildlife ResourcesUniversity of Idaho
    • Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks
  • Christopher A. Peery
    • Idaho Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, Department of Fish and Wildlife ResourcesUniversity of Idaho
    • Idaho Fisheries Research OfficeUS Fish and Wildlife Service
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10641-009-9490-7

Cite this article as:
Keefer, M.L., Moser, M.L., Boggs, C.T. et al. Environ Biol Fish (2009) 85: 253. doi:10.1007/s10641-009-9490-7

Abstract

We examined the effects of river environment on the timing of spawning migrations by anadromous Pacific lamprey, Lampetra tridentata, in the Columbia River (U.S.A.). In a 41-year time series of adult lamprey counts, migration timing was earliest in warm, low-discharge years and latest in cold, high-flow years. Threshold temperatures associated with run timing were similar throughout the dataset despite significant impoundment-related warming, suggesting that temperature-dependent migration cues have been temporally stable. Within each year, migration rates of PIT-tagged lampreys were positively correlated with temperature and negatively correlated with discharge through multiple river reaches, offering additional evidence for environmental control of upstream movement. Both visual count and PIT-tag data indicated that there may be population-based differences in migration timing within the aggregate Columbia River lamprey run. These life history and behavioral results have potentially far-reaching implications for management of lamprey species.

Keywords

Entosphenus tridentatusLampetra tridentataLife historyHomingTemperaturePopulation structureDischarge

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009