Original Article

Digestive Diseases and Sciences

, Volume 55, Issue 7, pp 1975-1981

First online:

JC Virus T-Antigen DNA in Gastrointestinal Mucosa of Immunosuppressed Patients: A Prospective, Controlled Study

  • Doron BoltinAffiliated withDepartment of Internal Medicine 6, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical CenterDepartment of Gastroenterology, Rabin Medical CenterTel Aviv University
  • , Alex VilkinAffiliated withDepartment of Gastroenterology, Rabin Medical CenterTel Aviv University
  • , Zohar LeviAffiliated withDepartment of Gastroenterology, Rabin Medical CenterTel Aviv University
  • , Ori ElkayamAffiliated withDepartment of Internal Medicine 6, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical CenterTel Aviv University
  • , Yaron NivAffiliated withDepartment of Gastroenterology, Rabin Medical CenterTel Aviv University Email author 

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Abstract

Background

JC virus (JCV), a polyoma virus, is the etiological agent of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy in immunosuppressed patients. JCV T-Ag has proven oncogenic potential and is expressed in colonic polyps and carcinomas. We proposed that the prevalence of JCV T-Ag DNA is higher in the normal gastrointestinal (GI) mucosa of immunosuppressed patients compared with their immunocompetent counterparts.

Aims

To look for JCV T-Ag DNA in the normal gastrointestinal mucosa of immunosuppressed patients compared with immunocompetent controls.

Methods

Macroscopically normal samples of upper and lower GI mucosa were obtained from 38 immunosuppressed patients. A control group included samples from 19 immunocompetent inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and 29 non-IBD cases. DNA was extracted and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed using primers specific for T-Ag.

Results

JCV T-Ag DNA was found in nine of the immunosuppressed patients (23.7%) and in three of the controls (6.3%; P = 0.02). Transplant recipients had a particularly high prevalence of JCV T-Ag DNA (35.3%). Patients with IBD receiving immunosuppressive drugs had a higher prevalence of JCV T-Ag DNA in comparison with IBD patients who did not receive immunosuppression (22.2% versus 10.5%, respectively), but this difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.574).

Conclusion

JCV T-Ag DNA is more prevalent in the upper and lower GI mucosa of immunosuppressed patients, possibly indicating that the virus resides in these patients. This may account for the higher prevalence of GI carcinomas in immunosuppressed patients.

Keywords

JC virus T-Ag Immunosuppression Gastrointestinal mucosa