Digestive Diseases and Sciences

, Volume 52, Issue 4, pp 1082–1086

Screening for Celiac Disease in Family Members: Is Follow-up Testing Necessary?

  • David Goldberg
  • Debbie Kryszak
  • Alessio Fasano
  • Peter H. R. Green
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10620-006-9518-1

Cite this article as:
Goldberg, D., Kryszak, D., Fasano, A. et al. Dig Dis Sci (2007) 52: 1082. doi:10.1007/s10620-006-9518-1

Abstract

Celiac disease is a genetically determined intolerance to gluten that results in villous atrophy in the small intestine. Because celiac disease occurs in families, relatives of affected individuals are tested for the disease. However, there are no evidence-based guidelines for when, or how often, to test relatives. Our goal was to determine if one-time screening of relatives is sufficient. Of 171 family members with an initially negative endomysial antibody who were tested on more than one occasion, 6 (3.5%) were positive on repeat testing. The average time to seroconversion was 1.7±1.2 years (range, 6 months–3 years 2 months). Only one of the seroconverters had diarrhea; the remainder were asymptomatic. None of the patients had a change in symptoms between testing. We conclude that one-time testing for celiac disease among families with affected members is insufficient. Repeat testing should occur irrespective of the presence of symptoms.

Keywords

Celiac disease Family members Endomysial antibodies Screening Seroconversion Follow-up testing 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • David Goldberg
    • 1
  • Debbie Kryszak
    • 2
  • Alessio Fasano
    • 2
  • Peter H. R. Green
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of MedicineColumbia University College of Physicians and SurgeonsNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Department of PediatricsUniversity of MarylandBaltimoreUSA

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