, Volume 50, Issue 8, pp 1513-1516

13C-Urea Breath Test for Success of Helicobacter pylori Eradication: Study of 5885 Israeli Patients.

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Abstract

Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection is highly prevalent in many countries and may cause gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, gastric cancer, and lymphoma. Successful eradication depends on the specific treatment used, patient compliance, and Hp antibiotic resistance. The primary aim was to characterize groups of patients with one or more failures of Hp eradication treatment. The secondary aim was to evaluate the factors that influence eradication failure. Between April 1, 1998, and December 31, 2001, 5885 patients were studied for the success of Hp eradication with the 13C-urea breath test (13C-UBT): 5442 after one course of treatment (Group I), 380 after two courses (Group II), and 63 after three courses (Group III). The 13C-UBT was positive in 27.8%, 37.4%, and 47.6% of patients in Groups I, II, and III, respectively (P I-II = 0.000, P II-III = 0.126). A combination of omeprazole, amoxicillin, and clarithromycin (OAC) was used in 31.3%, 27.4%, and 7.9% of Groups I, II, and III, respectively, and a combination of omeprazole, amoxicillin, and metronidazole (OAM) in 15.2%, 28.9%, and 28.6%, respectively. Regimens that contained clarithromycin were used in decreasing order in Groups I, II, and III, and regimens containing metronidazole, bismuth, or tetracycline, in increasing order. The only good prognostic factor for successful eradication was Israeli origin, while European–American and Asian–African origin, recurrence of symptoms, a history of duodenal ulcer, and chronic proton pump inhibitor (PPI) use did not favor successful eradication. Our results suggest that origin, history of peptic disease, and chronic PPI use are predictors of eradication failure.