Cytotechnology

, 50:77

Regulating apoptosis in mammalian cell cultures

Authors

  • Nilou Arden
    • Department of Chemical and Biomolecular EngineeringThe Johns Hopkins University
    • Department of Chemical and Biomolecular EngineeringThe Johns Hopkins University
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10616-006-9008-5

Cite this article as:
Arden, N. & Betenbaugh, M. Cytotechnology (2006) 50: 77. doi:10.1007/s10616-006-9008-5

Abstract

Cell culture technology has become a widely accepted method used to derive therapeutic and diagnostic protein products. Mammalian cells adapted to grow in bioreactors now play an integral role in the development of these biologicals. A major limiting factor determining the output efficiency of mammalian cell cultures however, is apoptosis or programmed cell death. Methods to delay apoptosis and increase the longevity of cell cultures can lead to more economical processes. Researchers have shown that both genetic and chemical strategies to block apoptotic signals can increase cell culture productivity. Here, we discuss various strategies which have been implemented to improve cellular viabilities and productivities in batch cultures.

Keywords

Mammalian cell cultureApoptosisBcl-2 proteinCell cycle arrestRecombinant protein production

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2006