Cognitive Therapy and Research

, Volume 34, Issue 2, pp 107–115

Self-report and Cognitive Processing Measures of Depressive Thinking Predict Subsequent Major Depressive Disorder

  • Stephanie S. Rude
  • Jennifer A. Durham-Fowler
  • Emily S. Baum
  • Stephanie B. Rooney
  • Kacey L. Maestas
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10608-009-9237-y

Cite this article as:
Rude, S.S., Durham-Fowler, J.A., Baum, E.S. et al. Cogn Ther Res (2010) 34: 107. doi:10.1007/s10608-009-9237-y

Abstract

We examined the utility of two measures of cognitive bias—a self-report questionnaire, the Dysfunctional Attitudes Scale (Weissman and Beck 1978), and a cognitive processing task, the Scrambled Sentences Test (Wenzlaff 1988, 1993), in predicting episodes of depression prospectively in a community-based sample of nondepressed women. When examined separately, each measure contributed significantly to predicting a subsequent diagnosis of MDD, supporting the utility of both types of measures as indicators of depression vulnerability. When examined together, each measure made an independent contribution to the prediction of MDD, raising the possibility that questionnaire and processing tasks may assess separate aspects of cognitive vulnerability to depression.

Keywords

DepressionMajor depressive disorderCognitive vulnerabilityDepressive thinkingDysfunctional attitudesDepression vulnerabilityPrediction of depressionCognitive processingCognitive processing measuresSelf-report measures

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stephanie S. Rude
    • 1
  • Jennifer A. Durham-Fowler
    • 1
  • Emily S. Baum
    • 1
  • Stephanie B. Rooney
    • 1
  • Kacey L. Maestas
    • 1
  1. 1.The University of Texas at AustinAustinUSA