Cognitive Therapy and Research

, Volume 33, Issue 5, pp 449–461

Exploring the Efficacy of Cognitive Bibliotherapy and a Potential Mechanism of Change in the Treatment of Depressive Symptoms Among the Chinese: A Randomized Controlled Trial

  • Emily Tung-Hsueh Liu
  • Wan-Lan Chen
  • Yi-Hwei Li
  • Chiao Han Wang
  • Tze Jing Mok
  • Hwei Shan Huang
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10608-008-9228-4

Cite this article as:
Liu, E.T., Chen, W., Li, Y. et al. Cogn Ther Res (2009) 33: 449. doi:10.1007/s10608-008-9228-4

Abstract

The present study investigated the efficacy of cognitive bibliotherapy in the treatment of depressive symptoms among Chinese individuals in Taiwan. Adults with depressive symptoms (N = 52, M age = 26.4) were randomly assigned to the treatment condition or the delayed treatment control condition. Participants were assessed at pretreatment, posttreatment, and 3-month follow-up. Results indicated that participants’ overall depression level lowered at posttreatment. Analyses were performed on the intention-to-treat basis. Multiple imputation inference procedure (Rubin in Multiple imputation for nonresponse in surveys, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., New York 1987) was adopted to estimate missing values and to draw inferences based on the imputed data. Results of the analyses indicated that the cognitive-affective symptoms of depression, rather than the somatic symptoms of depression, evidenced significant reduction as a result of cognitive bibliotherapy. Further reductions in cognitive-affective symptoms were observed at 3-month follow-up. Lastly, learned resourcefulness was found to be a mechanism through which bibliotherapy reduced depressive symptoms. The present study provides preliminary evidence that cognitive bibliotherapy may be a promising treatment option for Chinese individuals with depressive symptoms. In the meantime, participants’ qualitative feedback may provide important direction for cross-cultural adaptation of cognitive bibliotherapy. Applied implications and cultural issues are discussed.

Keywords

ChineseBibliotherapyDepressionLearned resourcefulnessMediator

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Emily Tung-Hsueh Liu
    • 1
  • Wan-Lan Chen
    • 2
  • Yi-Hwei Li
    • 3
  • Chiao Han Wang
    • 1
  • Tze Jing Mok
    • 1
  • Hwei Shan Huang
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Clinical Psychology, College of MedicineFu Jen Catholic UniversityHsin ChuangTaiwan
  2. 2.Department of Human DevelopmentTzu-Chi UniversityHualien CityTaiwan
  3. 3.Department of Public HealthTzu-Chi UniversityHualien CityTaiwan