Cognitive Therapy and Research

, 32:775

Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy and Self-Discrepancy in Recovered Depressed Patients with a History of Depression and Suicidality

  • Catherine Crane
  • Thorsten Barnhofer
  • Danielle S. Duggan
  • Silvia Hepburn
  • Melanie V. Fennell
  • J. Mark G. Williams
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10608-008-9193-y

Cite this article as:
Crane, C., Barnhofer, T., Duggan, D.S. et al. Cogn Ther Res (2008) 32: 775. doi:10.1007/s10608-008-9193-y
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Abstract

Long-term vulnerability to depression is related to the presence of perceived discrepancies between the actual self and ideal self-guides. This study examined the immediate effects of an 8-week course of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) on self-discrepancies in individuals currently in recovery, with a history of affective disorder that included suicidal ideation and behaviour. Results indicated significant time × group interactions for both ideal self similarity and ideal self likelihood ratings, primarily accounted for by increases in self-discrepancy from pre-test to post-test in the waiting list group which were not seen in those receiving MBCT. Changes in self-discrepancy were not associated with changes in residual depressive symptoms, but in the MBCT group there was a significant association between increases in ideal self similarity and the adoption of more adaptive ideal self-guides post treatment. MBCT may protect against increases in self-discrepancy in people vulnerable to relapse to depression and may also facilitate a shift in the goals of self-regulation.

Keywords

Self-discrepancyDepressionSuicideMindfulness-based cognitive therapyRelapseGoals

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Catherine Crane
    • 1
  • Thorsten Barnhofer
    • 1
  • Danielle S. Duggan
    • 1
  • Silvia Hepburn
    • 2
  • Melanie V. Fennell
    • 1
  • J. Mark G. Williams
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryWarneford Hospital, University of OxfordOxfordUK
  2. 2.Institute of PsychiatryLondonUK