Original Paper

Community Mental Health Journal

, Volume 46, Issue 6, pp 540-552

First online:

A Pilot Evaluation of the In SHAPE Individualized Health Promotion Intervention for Adults with Mental Illness

  • Aricca D. Van CittersAffiliated withDepartment of Community and Family Medicine, Dartmouth Medical School, Center for Aging Research, The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice
  • , Sarah I. PrattAffiliated withDepartment of Psychiatry, Dartmouth Medical School, Dartmouth Psychiatric Research Center
  • , Kenneth JueAffiliated withMonadnock Family Services
  • , Gail WilliamsAffiliated withDepartment of Psychiatry, Dartmouth Medical School, Dartmouth Psychiatric Research Center
  • , Patricia T. MillerAffiliated withDepartment of Psychiatry, Dartmouth Medical School, Dartmouth Psychiatric Research Center
  • , Haiyi XieAffiliated withDepartment of Community and Family Medicine, Dartmouth Medical School, Dartmouth Psychiatric Research Center, Rivermill Commercial Center
  • , Stephen J. BartelsAffiliated withDepartment of Community and Family Medicine, Dartmouth Medical School, Center for Aging Research, The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical PracticeDepartment of Psychiatry, Dartmouth Medical School, Dartmouth Psychiatric Research Center Email author 

Rent the article at a discount

Rent now

* Final gross prices may vary according to local VAT.

Get Access

Abstract

This pilot study examined whether participation in the individualized, community-integrated In SHAPE health promotion program would result in improved physical activity and dietary behaviors, health indicators, and psychological functioning or symptoms in 76 adults with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, major depression, or other mental disorders. Over a 9-month period, participation was associated with increased exercise, vigorous activity, and leisurely walking (P < .01), and a trend toward improved readiness to reduce caloric intake (P = .053). Participants demonstrated a reduction in waist circumference (P < .05), but no change in BMI. Satisfaction with fitness (P < .001) and mental health functioning (P < .05) improved, and severity of negative symptoms decreased (P < .01). This study demonstrated the feasibility and potential effectiveness of the In SHAPE program, which consisted of exercise and dietary modification. Based on these promising results, randomized controlled trials of the In SHAPE program are necessary to establish its effectiveness compared with usual care and alternative approaches to enhancing fitness.

Keywords

Fitness Exercise Diet Serious mental illness Health promotion