Conservation Genetics

, Volume 14, Issue 6, pp 1185–1192

The Meeting of Waters, a possible shelter of evolutionary significant units for Amazonian fish

  • Alba Ardura
  • Vanessa Gomes
  • Ana R. Linde
  • Josino C. Moreira
  • Jose L. Horreo
  • Eva Garcia-Vazquez
Research Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10592-013-0505-8

Cite this article as:
Ardura, A., Gomes, V., Linde, A.R. et al. Conserv Genet (2013) 14: 1185. doi:10.1007/s10592-013-0505-8

Abstract

Identification of priority conservation areas is crucial for safeguarding freshwater ecosystems. Occurrence of unique populations and/or evolutionary significant units for key species is one of the most frequent reasons for protecting a region or location. In this study we have studied two of the most important fisheries resources of the Amazon basin, Curimata and Tambaqui, from different areas, in order to identify common zones of special diversity. Employing the Barcoding cytochrome oxidase I gene as a genetic tool, we have detected a clear differentiation of the populations inhabiting the Meeting of Waters and the rest of the basin for both species. This area corresponds to the confluence of the Solimões and the Negro rivers, of different physicochemical water characteristics, at the Brazilian city of Manaus in central Amazonas. The Meeting of Waters area (near Manaus) could be recommended as a potential area subject of special management, given its apparent role as a shelter for evolutionary significant units.

Keywords

Amazon river Meeting of Waters Mitochondrial DNA Prochilodus nigricans Colossoma macropomum Population structure 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alba Ardura
    • 1
  • Vanessa Gomes
    • 2
  • Ana R. Linde
    • 2
  • Josino C. Moreira
    • 2
  • Jose L. Horreo
    • 1
  • Eva Garcia-Vazquez
    • 1
  1. 1.Departamento de Biologia FuncionalUniversidad de OviedoOviedoSpain
  2. 2.Laboratorio de ToxicologiaEscola Nacional de Saúde Pública, Fundaçao Oswaldo CruzRio de JaneiroBrazil