Conservation Genetics

, Volume 11, Issue 1, pp 195–211

Mitochondrial Control Region and microsatellite analyses on harbour porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) unravel population differentiation in the Baltic Sea and adjacent waters

  • Annika Wiemann
  • Liselotte W. Andersen
  • Per Berggren
  • Ursula Siebert
  • Harald Benke
  • Jonas Teilmann
  • Christina Lockyer
  • Iwona Pawliczka
  • Krzysztof Skóra
  • Anna Roos
  • Thomas Lyrholm
  • Kirsten B. Paulus
  • Valerio Ketmaier
  • Ralph Tiedemann
Research Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10592-009-0023-x

Cite this article as:
Wiemann, A., Andersen, L.W., Berggren, P. et al. Conserv Genet (2010) 11: 195. doi:10.1007/s10592-009-0023-x

Abstract

The population status of the harbour porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) in the Baltic area has been a continuous matter of debate. Here we present the by far most comprehensive genetic population structure assessment to date for this region, both with regard to geographic coverage and sample size: 497 porpoise samples from North Sea, Skagerrak, Kattegat, Belt Sea, and Inner Baltic Sea were sequenced at the mitochondrial Control Region and 305 of these specimens were typed at 15 polymorphic microsatellite loci. Samples were stratified according to sample type (stranding vs. by-caught), sex, and season (breeding vs. non-breeding season). Our data provide ample evidence for a population split between the Skagerrak and the Belt Sea, with a transition zone in the Kattegat area. Among other measures, this was particularly visible in significant frequency shifts of the most abundant mitochondrial haplotypes. A particular haplotype almost absent in the North Sea was the most abundant in Belt Sea and Inner Baltic Sea. Microsatellites yielded a similar pattern (i.e., turnover in occurrence of clusters identified by STRUCTURE). Moreover, a highly significant association between microsatellite assignment and unlinked mitochondrial haplotypes further indicates a split between North Sea and Baltic porpoises. For the Inner Baltic Sea, we consistently recovered a small, but significant separation from the Belt Sea population. Despite recent arguments that separation should exceed a predefined threshold before populations shall be managed separately, we argue in favour of precautionary acknowledging the Inner Baltic porpoises as a separate management unit, which should receive particular attention, as it is threatened by various factors, in particular local fishery measures.

Keywords

Demographic independence Management unit Mitochondrial DNA Microsatellites Phocoena phocoena Population 

Supplementary material

10592_2009_23_MOESM1_ESM.doc (541 kb)
(DOC 541 kb)

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Annika Wiemann
    • 1
  • Liselotte W. Andersen
    • 2
  • Per Berggren
    • 3
  • Ursula Siebert
    • 4
  • Harald Benke
    • 5
  • Jonas Teilmann
    • 6
  • Christina Lockyer
    • 7
  • Iwona Pawliczka
    • 8
  • Krzysztof Skóra
    • 8
  • Anna Roos
    • 9
  • Thomas Lyrholm
    • 9
  • Kirsten B. Paulus
    • 1
  • Valerio Ketmaier
    • 1
  • Ralph Tiedemann
    • 1
  1. 1.Unit of Evolutionary Biology/Systematic Zoology, Institute of Biochemistry and BiologyUniversity of PotsdamPotsdamGermany
  2. 2.Department of Wildlife Ecology and Biodiversity, Danish National Environmental Research InstituteUniversity of ÅrhusRøndeDenmark
  3. 3.Department of ZoologyStockholm UniversityStockholmSweden
  4. 4.Research and Technology Center WestcoastChristian-Albrechts-University KielBüsumGermany
  5. 5.Deutsches MeeresmuseumStralsundGermany
  6. 6.Department of Arctic Environment, Danish National Environmental Research InstituteUniversity of ÅrhusRoskildeDenmark
  7. 7.Age DynamicsKongens LyngbyDenmark
  8. 8.Hel Marine StationUniversity of GdanskHelPoland
  9. 9.Swedish Museum of Natural HistoryStockholmSweden

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