Conservation Genetics

, 9:869

Small effective population sizes of two remnant ocelot populations (Leopardus pardalis albescens) in the United States

  • Jan E. Janečka
  • M. E. Tewes
  • L. L. Laack
  • L. I. GrassmanJr
  • A. M. Haines
  • R. L. Honeycutt
Research Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10592-007-9412-1

Cite this article as:
Janečka, J.E., Tewes, M.E., Laack, L.L. et al. Conserv Genet (2008) 9: 869. doi:10.1007/s10592-007-9412-1

Abstract

Threatened populations are vulnerable to the effects of genetic drift and inbreeding, particularly when gene flow is low and the effective population size is small. Estimates of effective population size (Ne) provide important information on the status of endangered populations that have experienced severe fragmentation and serve as indicators of genetic viability. Genetic data from microsatellite loci were used to estimate Ne for the 2 remaining populations of the endangered ocelot (Leopardus pardalis albescens) occurring in the United States. Several methods were used to calculate Ne, resulting in estimates ranging from Ne = 8.0 (95% CI: 3.2–23.1) to 13.9 (95% CI: 7.7–25.1) for the population located at the Laguna Atascosa Wildlife Refuge in Cameron County, Texas. The ocelot population in Willacy County, Texas, had Ne estimates of 2.9 (95% CI: 1.7–5.6) and 3.1 (95% CI: 1.9–13.5), respectively. Estimates of Ne in both populations were below the critical value recommended for short-term viability.

Keywords

Conservation biologyEffective population sizeMicrosatellitesEndangeredOcelot

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jan E. Janečka
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • M. E. Tewes
    • 1
  • L. L. Laack
    • 4
  • L. I. GrassmanJr
    • 1
  • A. M. Haines
    • 1
  • R. L. Honeycutt
    • 2
    • 5
  1. 1.Feline Research Program, Caesar Kleberg Wildlife Research InstituteTexas A&M University-KingsvilleKingsvilleUSA
  2. 2.Department of Wildlife and Fisheries SciencesTexas A&M UniversityCollege StationUSA
  3. 3.Department of Veterinary Integrative Biosciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical SciencesTexas A&M UniversityCollege StationUSA
  4. 4.Laguna Atascosa National Wildlife RefugeRio HondoUSA
  5. 5.Natural Science DivisionPepperdine UniversityMalibuUSA