Climatic Change

, Volume 112, Issue 2, pp 189–215

Elevation gradients of European climate change in the regional climate model COSMO-CLM

  • S. Kotlarski
  • T. Bosshard
  • D. Lüthi
  • P. Pall
  • C. Schär
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10584-011-0195-5

Cite this article as:
Kotlarski, S., Bosshard, T., Lüthi, D. et al. Climatic Change (2012) 112: 189. doi:10.1007/s10584-011-0195-5

Abstract

A transient climate scenario experiment of the regional climate model COSMO-CLM is analyzed to assess the elevation dependency of 21st century European climate change. A focus is put on near-surface conditions. Model evaluation reveals that COSMO-CLM is able to approximately reproduce the observed altitudinal variation of 2 m temperature and precipitation in most regions and most seasons. The analysis of climate change signals suggests that 21st century climate change might considerably depend on elevation. Over most parts of Europe and in most seasons, near-surface warming significantly increases with elevation. This is consistent with the simulated changes of the free-tropospheric air temperature, but can only be fully explained by taking into account regional-scale processes involving the land surface. In winter and spring, the anomalous high-elevation warming is typically connected to a decrease in the number of snow days and the snow-albedo feedback. Further factors are changes in cloud cover and soil moisture and the proximity of low-elevation regions to the sea. The amplified warming at high elevations becomes apparent during the first half of the 21st century and results in a general decrease of near-surface lapse rates. It does not imply an early detection potential of large-scale temperature changes. For precipitation, only few consistent signals arise. In many regions precipitation changes show a pronounced elevation dependency but the details strongly depend on the season and the region under consideration. There is a tendency towards a larger relative decrease of summer precipitation at low elevations, but there are exceptions to this as well.

Supplementary material

10584_2011_195_MOESM1_ESM.pdf (2.4 mb)
ESM 1(PDF 2482 kb)

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Kotlarski
    • 1
  • T. Bosshard
    • 1
  • D. Lüthi
    • 1
  • P. Pall
    • 1
  • C. Schär
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute for Atmospheric and Climate ScienceETH ZurichZürichSwitzerland

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