Climatic Change

, Volume 103, Issue 3, pp 445–470

A conceptual framework for multi-regional climate change assessments for international market systems with long-term investments

  • Julie A. Winkler
  • Suzanne Thornsbury
  • Marco Artavia
  • Frank-M. Chmielewski
  • Dieter Kirschke
  • Sangjun Lee
  • Malgorzata Liszewska
  • Scott Loveridge
  • Pang-Ning Tan
  • Sharon Zhong
  • Jeffrey A. Andresen
  • J. Roy Black
  • Robert Kurlus
  • Denys Nizalov
  • Nicole Olynk
  • Zbigniew Ustrnul
  • Costanza Zavalloni
  • Jeanne M. Bisanz
  • Géza Bujdosó
  • Lesley Fusina
  • Yvonne Henniges
  • Peter Hilsendegen
  • Katarzyna Lar
  • Lukasz Malarzewski
  • Thordis Moeller
  • Roman Murmylo
  • Tadeusz Niedzwiedz
  • Olena Nizalova
  • Haryono Prawiranata
  • Nikki Rothwell
  • Jenni van Ravensway
  • Harald von Witzke
  • Mollie Woods
Open AccessArticle

DOI: 10.1007/s10584-009-9781-1

Cite this article as:
Winkler, J.A., Thornsbury, S., Artavia, M. et al. Climatic Change (2010) 103: 445. doi:10.1007/s10584-009-9781-1

Abstract

A conceptual framework for climate change assessments of international market systems that involve long-term investments is proposed. The framework is a hybrid of dynamic and static modeling. Dynamic modeling is used for those system components for which temporally continuous modeling is possible, while fixed time slices are used for other system components where it can be assumed that underlying assumptions are held constant within the time slices but allowed to vary between slices. An important component of the framework is the assessment of the “metauncertainty” arising from the structural uncertainties of a linked sequence of climate, production, trade and decision-making models. The impetus for proposing the framework is the paucity of industry-wide assessments for market systems with multiple production regions and long-term capital investments that are vulnerable to climate variations and change, especially climate extremes. The proposed framework is pragmatic, eschewing the ideal for the tractable. Even so, numerous implementation challenges are expected, which are illustrated using an example industry. The conceptual framework is offered as a starting point for further discussions of strategies and approaches for climate change impact, vulnerability and adaptation assessments for international market systems.

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© The Author(s) 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Julie A. Winkler
    • 1
  • Suzanne Thornsbury
    • 2
  • Marco Artavia
    • 3
  • Frank-M. Chmielewski
    • 4
  • Dieter Kirschke
    • 3
  • Sangjun Lee
    • 2
  • Malgorzata Liszewska
    • 5
  • Scott Loveridge
    • 2
  • Pang-Ning Tan
    • 6
  • Sharon Zhong
    • 1
  • Jeffrey A. Andresen
    • 1
  • J. Roy Black
    • 2
  • Robert Kurlus
    • 7
  • Denys Nizalov
    • 8
  • Nicole Olynk
    • 2
  • Zbigniew Ustrnul
    • 9
  • Costanza Zavalloni
    • 10
  • Jeanne M. Bisanz
    • 1
  • Géza Bujdosó
    • 11
  • Lesley Fusina
    • 1
  • Yvonne Henniges
    • 4
  • Peter Hilsendegen
    • 12
  • Katarzyna Lar
    • 7
  • Lukasz Malarzewski
    • 13
  • Thordis Moeller
    • 14
  • Roman Murmylo
    • 8
  • Tadeusz Niedzwiedz
    • 13
  • Olena Nizalova
    • 8
  • Haryono Prawiranata
    • 1
  • Nikki Rothwell
    • 15
  • Jenni van Ravensway
    • 1
  • Harald von Witzke
    • 14
  • Mollie Woods
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of GeographyMichigan State UniversityEast LansingUSA
  2. 2.Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource EconomicsMichigan Sate UniversityEast LansingUSA
  3. 3.Department of Agricultural Economics and PolicyHumboldt-UniversityBerlinGermany
  4. 4.Faculty of Agriculture and HorticultureHumboldt-UniversityBerlinGermany
  5. 5.Interdisciplinary Centre for Mathematical and Computational ModellingUniversity of WarsawWarsawPoland
  6. 6.Department of Computer Science and EngineeringMichigan State UniversityEast LansingUSA
  7. 7.Department of PomologyPoznan University of Life SciencesPoznanPoland
  8. 8.Kyiv Economics InstituteKyiv School of EconomicsKyivUkraine
  9. 9.Department of ClimatologyJagiellonian UniversityKrakówPoland
  10. 10.Department of Agriculture and Environmental SciencesUniversity of UdineUdineItaly
  11. 11.Research Institute for Fruit Growing and OrnamentalsBudapestHungary
  12. 12.DLR RheinpfalzOppenheimGermany
  13. 13.Department of ClimatologyUniversity of SilesiaSosnowiecPoland
  14. 14.Department of International Agricultural Trade and DevelopmentHumboldt-UniversityBerlinGermany
  15. 15.Northwest Horticultural Research StationMichigan State UniversityTraverse CityUSA