Original Article

Child Psychiatry & Human Development

, Volume 46, Issue 1, pp 44-56

Adaptive Multimodal Treatment for Children with Attention-Deficit-/Hyperactivity Disorder: An 18 Month Follow-Up

  • Manfred DöpfnerAffiliated withDepartment of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Medical Faculty, University of Cologne Email author 
  • , Elena IseAffiliated withDepartment of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Medical Faculty, University of Cologne
  • , Tanja Wolff Metternich-KaizmanAffiliated withDepartment of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Medical Faculty, University of Cologne
  • , Stephanie SchürmannAffiliated withDepartment of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Medical Faculty, University of Cologne
  • , Christiane RademacherAffiliated withDepartment of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Medical Faculty, University of Cologne
  • , Dieter BreuerAffiliated withDepartment of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Medical Faculty, University of Cologne

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Abstract

The Cologne Adaptive Multimodal Treatment (CAMT) study demonstrated that adaptive and individually tailored multimodal treatment for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) [consisting of behavior therapy (BT) and/or stimulant medication] is highly effective. This study reports findings of the 18 month follow-up assessment. Parents and teachers completed broad range behavior scales (Child Behavior Checklist/Teacher Report Form) and standardized ADHD and oppositional defiant disorder/conduct disorder symptom rating scales. Children that used medication to treat ADHD at follow-up (N = 32) and those that did not (N = 34) were analyzed separately. Parents did not report significant changes in child behavior from posttest to follow-up. Teacher ratings revealed some aggravation of ADHD symptoms in children that received medication, but this was not significant after Bonferroni correction. The initial advantage of combined treatment over BT was no longer evident. It can be concluded that treatment for ADHD that is tailored to the assessed needs of children results in large treatment effects that are maintained for at least 18 months.

Keywords

ADHD Multimodal treatment Behavior therapy Medical management Long-term effectiveness