Cellular and Molecular Neurobiology

, Volume 25, Issue 1, pp 181–199

Mechanisms of the Blood–Brain Barrier Disruption in HIV-1 Infection

  • Michal Toborek
  • Yong Woo Lee
  • Govinder Flora
  • Hong Pu
  • Ibolya E. András
  • Edward Wylegala
  • Bernhard Hennig
  • Avindra Nath
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10571-004-1383-x

Cite this article as:
Toborek, M., Lee, Y.W., Flora, G. et al. Cell Mol Neurobiol (2005) 25: 181. doi:10.1007/s10571-004-1383-x

Summary

1. Alterations of brain microvasculature and the disruption of the blood–brain barrier (BBB) integrity are commonly associated with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. These changes are most frequently found in human immunodeficiency virus-related encephalitis (HIVE) and in human immunodeficiency virus-associated dementia (HAD).

2. It has been hypothesized that the disruption of the BBB occurs early in the course of HIV-1 infection and can be responsible for HIV-1 entry into the CNS.

3. The current review discusses the mechanisms of injury to brain endothelial cells and alterations of the BBB integrity in HIV-infection with focus on the vascular effects of HIV Tat protein. In addition, this review describes the mechanisms of the BBB disruption due to HIV-1 or Tat protein interaction with selected risk factors for HIV infection, such as substance abuse and aging.

Key words

HIVAIDSblood–brain barrierbrain endothelial cellsinflammatory responsestight junctionTat

Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michal Toborek
    • 1
    • 5
  • Yong Woo Lee
    • 1
  • Govinder Flora
    • 1
  • Hong Pu
    • 1
  • Ibolya E. András
    • 1
  • Edward Wylegala
    • 2
  • Bernhard Hennig
    • 3
  • Avindra Nath
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of SurgeryUniversity of KentuckyLexington
  2. 2.Department of OphthalmologyRailway HospitalKatowicePoland
  3. 3.College of AgricultureUniversity of KentuckyLexingtonKentucky
  4. 4.Department of NeurologyJohns Hopkins UniversityBaltimore
  5. 5.Department of Surgery, Division of NeurosurgeryUniversity of Kentucky Medical CenterLexington