Cellulose

, Volume 22, Issue 3, pp 1469–1484

Vibrational spectral signatures of crystalline cellulose using high resolution broadband sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (HR-BB-SFG-VS)

  • Libing Zhang
  • Zhou Lu
  • Luis Velarde
  • Li Fu
  • Yunqiao Pu
  • Shi-You Ding
  • Arthur J. Ragauskas
  • Hong-Fei Wang
  • Bin Yang
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10570-015-0588-0

Cite this article as:
Zhang, L., Lu, Z., Velarde, L. et al. Cellulose (2015) 22: 1469. doi:10.1007/s10570-015-0588-0

Abstract

Both the C–H and O–H region spectra of crystalline cellulose were studied using the sub-wavenumber high-resolution broadband sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (HR-BB-SFG-VS) for the first time. The resolution of HR-BB-SFG-VS is about 10-times better than conventional scanning SFG-VS and has the capability of measuring the intrinsic spectral lineshape and revealing many more spectral details. With HR-BB-SFG-VS, we found that in cellulose samples from different sources, including Avicel and cellulose crystals isolated from algae Valonia (Iα) and tunicates (Iβ), the spectral signatures in the O–H region were unique for the two allomorphs, i.e. Iα and Iβ, while the spectral signatures in the C–H regions varied in all samples examined. Even though the origin of the different spectral signatures of the crystalline cellulose in the O–H and C–H vibrational frequency regions are yet to be correlated to the structure of cellulose, these results lead to new spectroscopic methods and opportunities to classify and to understand the basic crystalline structures, as well as variations in polymorphism of the crystalline cellulose.

Keywords

Cellulose Iα Cellulose Iβ Avicel High resolution broadband sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (HR-BB-SFG-VS) 

Supplementary material

10570_2015_588_MOESM1_ESM.docx (156 kb)
Table S1 Peak position and relative peak intensity parameters from curve fitting using Lorentzian lineshape profiles (as in Eq. 3 in the main text) of (a) Avicel, (b) cellulose Iα from alga Valoniaventricosa (Glaucocystis (nostochinearum)), and (c) cellulose Iβs from red reef tunicate and (d) Halocynthiaroretzi tunicate within wavelength of 2700–3050 cm−1 and 3200 cm−1–3450 cm−1. (DOCX 156 kb)
10570_2015_588_MOESM2_ESM.docx (277 kb)
Figure S1 (a) Raman spectra of cellulose Iα from alga Valoniaventricosa (Glaucocystis (nostochinearum)) and (b) cellulose Iβ from Halocynthiaroretzi tunicate in the frequency regions of 300 to 1600 cm−1 and 2500 to 3700 cm−1. (DOCX 277 kb)

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Libing Zhang
    • 1
  • Zhou Lu
    • 2
    • 5
  • Luis Velarde
    • 2
    • 6
  • Li Fu
    • 2
  • Yunqiao Pu
    • 3
    • 7
  • Shi-You Ding
    • 4
    • 8
  • Arthur J. Ragauskas
    • 3
    • 7
  • Hong-Fei Wang
    • 2
  • Bin Yang
    • 1
  1. 1.Bioproduct Sciences and Engineering Laboratory, Department of Biological Systems EngineeringWashington State UniversityRichlandUSA
  2. 2.William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences LaboratoryPacific Northwest National LaboratoryRichlandUSA
  3. 3.School of Chemistry and BiochemistryGeorgia Institute of TechnologyAtlantaUSA
  4. 4.Biosciences CenterNational Renewable Energy LaboratoryGoldenUSA
  5. 5.Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, Institute of ChemistryThe Chinese Academy of SciencesBeijingChina
  6. 6.Department of ChemistryUniversity at Buffalo, The State University of New YorkBuffaloUSA
  7. 7.Department of Chemical and Biomolecular EngineeringThe University of TennesseeKnoxvilleUSA
  8. 8.Department of Plant BiologyMichigan State UniversityEast LansingUSA

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