, Volume 24, Issue 3, pp 289-295
Date: 06 Aug 2010

Cardioprotection in the Clinical Setting-Lessons from J-WIND Studies

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Abstract

Introduction

Both prevention and attenuation of ischemic heart disease are important issues, and there are three different strategies to save patients from the deleterious sequelae of ischemic injury. The first strategy is to remove the causes of ischemic heart disease; the second is to attenuate on-going ischemic and reperfusion injury; the third is to prevent the progression of cardiac remodeling and chronic heart failure following ischemic injury.

Evidence and Discussion

For prevention of acute myocardial infarction, it is widely accepted to treat high risk patients with aspirin and/or statins. On the other hand, several medications such as angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, aldosterone receptor antagonists and beta blockers have been used for the prevention of post-infarction heart failure in patients who have suffered from an acute myocardial infarction. However, at present we do not have an adjunctive drug therapy to reduce infarct size in the acute phase in patients with myocardial infarction. Recently, the J-WIND trials suggested that an infusion of human atrial natriuretic peptide in the acute phase and oral administration of nicorandil in the chronic phase of infarction result in a better outcome in patients with a myocardial infarction. In this article we propose potential mechanisms for cardioprotection in patients with an acute myocardial infarction.