Cancer and Metastasis Reviews

, Volume 27, Issue 2, pp 205–214

PTPL1: a large phosphatase with a split personality

Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10555-008-9114-2

Cite this article as:
Abaan, O.D. & Toretsky, J.A. Cancer Metastasis Rev (2008) 27: 205. doi:10.1007/s10555-008-9114-2

Abstract

Protein tyrosine phosphatase, PTPL1, (also known as PTPN13, FAP-1, PTP-BAS, PTP1E) is a non-receptor type PTP and, at 270 kDa, is the largest phosphatase within this group. In addition to the well-conserved PTP domain, PTPL1 contains at least 7 putative macromolecular interaction domains. This structural complexity indicates that PTPL1 may modulate diverse cellular functions, perhaps exerting both positive and negative effects. In accordance with this idea, while certain studies suggest that PTPL1 can act as a tumor-promoting gene other experimental studies have suggested that PTPL1 may function as a tumor suppressor. The role of PTPL1 in the cancer cell is therefore likely to be both complex and context dependent with possible roles including the modulation of growth, stress-response, and cytoskeletal remodeling pathways. Understanding the nature of molecular complexes containing PTPL1, its interaction partners, substrates, regulation and subcellular localization are key to unraveling the complex personality of this protein phosphatase.

Keywords

PTPL1FAP1PTPN13CancerTumor suppressorTumor promoter

Abbreviations

ESFT

Ewing’s Sarcoma Family of Tumors

FERM

band 4.1/ezrin/radixin/moesin

IκBα

Inhibitor of nuclear factor kappa-B alpha

KIND

Kinase non-catalytic C-lobe domain

PARG1

PTPL1-associated RhoGAP1

PDZ

PSD-95/Discs-large/ZO-1

PIP

Phosphatidylinositol biphosphates

PIP3

Phosphatidylinositol triphosphates

PKA

Protein kinase-A

PTP

Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase

TAPP

Tandem-PH-domain-containing proteins

TNFR

Tumor necrosis factor-receptor

TRIP6

Thyroid Hormone Receptor-interacting Protein 6

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Oncology, Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer CenterGeorgetown UniversityWashingtonUSA