Cancer Causes & Control

, Volume 26, Issue 7, pp 959–972

Proceedings of the second international molecular pathological epidemiology (MPE) meeting

  • Shuji Ogino
  • Peter T. Campbell
  • Reiko Nishihara
  • Amanda I. Phipps
  • Andrew H. Beck
  • Mark E. Sherman
  • Andrew T. Chan
  • Melissa A. Troester
  • Adam J. Bass
  • Kathryn C. Fitzgerald
  • Rafael A. Irizarry
  • Karl T. Kelsey
  • Hongmei Nan
  • Ulrike Peters
  • Elizabeth M. Poole
  • Zhi Rong Qian
  • Rulla M. Tamimi
  • Eric J. Tchetgen Tchetgen
  • Shelley S. Tworoger
  • Xuehong Zhang
  • Edward L. Giovannucci
  • Piet A. van den Brandt
  • Bernard A. Rosner
  • Molin Wang
  • Nilanjan Chatterjee
  • Colin B. Begg
Review article

DOI: 10.1007/s10552-015-0596-2

Cite this article as:
Ogino, S., Campbell, P.T., Nishihara, R. et al. Cancer Causes Control (2015) 26: 959. doi:10.1007/s10552-015-0596-2

Abstract

Disease classification system increasingly incorporates information on pathogenic mechanisms to predict clinical outcomes and response to therapy and intervention. Technological advancements to interrogate omics (genomics, epigenomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics, metagenomics, interactomics, etc.) provide widely open opportunities in population-based research. Molecular pathological epidemiology (MPE) represents integrative science of molecular pathology and epidemiology. This unified paradigm requires multidisciplinary collaboration between pathology, epidemiology, biostatistics, bioinformatics, and computational biology. Integration of these fields enables better understanding of etiologic heterogeneity, disease continuum, causal inference, and the impact of environment, diet, lifestyle, host factors (including genetics and immunity), and their interactions on disease evolution. Hence, the Second International MPE Meeting was held in Boston in December 2014, with aims to: (1) develop conceptual and practical frameworks; (2) cultivate and expand opportunities; (3) address challenges; and (4) initiate the effort of specifying guidelines for MPE. The meeting mainly consisted of presentations of method developments and recent data in various malignant neoplasms and tumors (breast, prostate, ovarian and colorectal cancers, renal cell carcinoma, lymphoma, and leukemia), followed by open discussion sessions on challenges and future plans. In particular, we recognized need for efforts to further develop statistical methodologies. This meeting provided an unprecedented opportunity for interdisciplinary collaboration, consistent with the purposes of the Big Data to Knowledge, Genetic Associations and Mechanisms in Oncology, and Precision Medicine Initiative of the US National Institute of Health. The MPE meeting series can help advance transdisciplinary population science and optimize training and education systems for twenty-first century medicine and public health.

Keywords

Epidemiologic method Molecular pathologic epidemiology Personalized medicine Systems biology Translational epidemiology Unique disease principle 

Abbreviations

BD2K

Big Data to Knowledge

BMI

Body mass index

CIMP

CpG island methylator phenotype

GAME-ON

Genetic Associations and Mechanisms in Oncology

GECCO

The Genetics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer Consortium

GWAS

Genome-wide association study

MPE

Molecular pathological epidemiology

MSI

Microsatellite instability

NIH

National Institute of Health

STROBE

Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shuji Ogino
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Peter T. Campbell
    • 4
  • Reiko Nishihara
    • 2
    • 3
    • 5
    • 6
  • Amanda I. Phipps
    • 7
    • 8
  • Andrew H. Beck
    • 9
    • 10
  • Mark E. Sherman
    • 11
    • 12
  • Andrew T. Chan
    • 13
    • 14
  • Melissa A. Troester
    • 15
  • Adam J. Bass
    • 2
    • 10
  • Kathryn C. Fitzgerald
    • 3
    • 6
  • Rafael A. Irizarry
    • 5
    • 16
  • Karl T. Kelsey
    • 17
  • Hongmei Nan
    • 18
  • Ulrike Peters
    • 7
    • 8
  • Elizabeth M. Poole
    • 14
  • Zhi Rong Qian
    • 2
  • Rulla M. Tamimi
    • 3
    • 14
  • Eric J. Tchetgen Tchetgen
    • 3
    • 5
  • Shelley S. Tworoger
    • 3
    • 14
  • Xuehong Zhang
    • 14
  • Edward L. Giovannucci
    • 3
    • 6
    • 14
  • Piet A. van den Brandt
    • 19
  • Bernard A. Rosner
    • 5
    • 14
  • Molin Wang
    • 3
    • 5
    • 14
  • Nilanjan Chatterjee
    • 12
  • Colin B. Begg
    • 20
  1. 1.Department of Pathology, Brigham and Women’s HospitalHarvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA
  2. 2.Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer InstituteHarvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA
  3. 3.Department of EpidemiologyHarvard T.H. Chan School of Public HealthBostonUSA
  4. 4.Epidemiology Research ProgramAmerican Cancer SocietyAtlantaUSA
  5. 5.Department of BiostatisticsHarvard T.H. Chan School of Public HealthBostonUSA
  6. 6.Department of NutritionHarvard T.H. Chan School of Public HealthBostonUSA
  7. 7.Department of EpidemiologyUniversity of WashingtonSeattleUSA
  8. 8.Public Health Sciences DivisionFred Hutchinson Cancer Research CenterSeattleUSA
  9. 9.Department of Pathology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical CenterHarvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA
  10. 10.The Broad InstituteCambridgeUSA
  11. 11.Breast and Gynecologic Cancer Research Group, Division of Cancer PreventionNational Cancer InstituteBethesdaUSA
  12. 12.Division of Cancer Epidemiology and GeneticsNational Cancer InstituteRockvilleUSA
  13. 13.Division of GastroenterologyMassachusetts General HospitalBostonUSA
  14. 14.Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women’s HospitalHarvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA
  15. 15.Department of EpidemiologyUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel HillChapel HillUSA
  16. 16.Department of Biostatics and Computational Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer InstituteHarvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA
  17. 17.Department of Pathology and Laboratory MedicineBrown UniversityProvidenceUSA
  18. 18.Department of Epidemiology, Richard M. Fairbanks School of Public Health, Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer CenterIndiana UniversityIndianapolisUSA
  19. 19.Department of EpidemiologyMaastricht UniversityMaastrichtThe Netherlands
  20. 20.Department of Epidemiology and BiostatisticsMemorial Sloan Kettering Cancer CenterNew YorkUSA

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