Cancer Causes & Control

, Volume 24, Issue 2, pp 323–334

Associations of adiponectin and leptin with stage and grade of PSA-detected prostate cancer: the ProtecT study

  • Anya Burton
  • Richard M. Martin
  • Jeff Holly
  • J. Athene Lane
  • Jenny L. Donovan
  • Freddie C. Hamdy
  • David E. Neal
  • Kate Tilling
Original paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10552-012-0118-4

Cite this article as:
Burton, A., Martin, R.M., Holly, J. et al. Cancer Causes Control (2013) 24: 323. doi:10.1007/s10552-012-0118-4

Abstract

Purpose

Obesity has been associated with an increased risk of advanced and fatal prostate cancer; adipokines may mediate this association. We examined associations of the adipokines leptin and adiponectin with the stage and grade of PSA-detected prostate cancer.

Methods

We conducted a nested case–control study comparing 311 men with mainly locally advanced (≥T3, N1, or M1 cases) vs. 413 men with localized (T ≤2 & NX-0 & M0 controls) PSA-detected prostate cancer, recruited 2001–2009 from 9 UK regions to the ProtecT study. Associations of body mass index and adipokine levels with prostate cancer stage were determined by conditional logistic regression and with grade (Gleason score ≥7 vs. ≤6) by unconditional logistic regression.

Results

Adiponectin was inversely associated with prostate cancer stage in overweight and obese men (OR 0.62; 95 % CI 0.42–0.90; p = 0.01), but not in normal weight men (OR 1.48; 0.77–2.82; p = 0.24) (p for interaction 0.007), or all men (OR 0.86; 0.66–1.11; p = 0.24). There was no compelling evidence of associations between leptin or leptin to adiponectin ratio and prostate cancer stage. No strong associations of adiponectin, leptin, or leptin:adiponectin ratio with grade were seen.

Conclusions

This study provides some evidence that adiponectin levels may be associated with prostate cancer stage, dependent on the degree of adiposity of the man. Our results are consistent with adiponectin countering the adverse effects of obesity on prostate cancer progression.

Keywords

Prostate cancer Adiponectin Leptin Progression Stage Body mass index 

Supplementary material

10552_2012_118_MOESM1_ESM.docx (297 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOCX 297 kb)

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anya Burton
    • 1
    • 2
  • Richard M. Martin
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jeff Holly
    • 3
  • J. Athene Lane
    • 1
  • Jenny L. Donovan
    • 1
  • Freddie C. Hamdy
    • 4
  • David E. Neal
    • 5
  • Kate Tilling
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Social and Community MedicineUniversity of BristolBristolUK
  2. 2.MRC Centre for Causal Analysis in Translational Epidemiology, School of Social and Community MedicineUniversity of BristolOakfield Grove, BristolUK
  3. 3.School of Clinical Sciences, Southmead HospitalUniversity of BristolBristolUK
  4. 4.Nuffield Department of Surgical SciencesJohn Radcliffe HospitalOxfordUK
  5. 5.Department of Oncology, Addenbrooke’s HospitalUniversity of CambridgeCambridgeUK

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