Cancer Causes & Control

, Volume 21, Issue 12, pp 1967–1977

Comprehensive cancer control: progress and accomplishments

  • Phyllis W. Rochester
  • Julie S. Townsend
  • Leslie Given
  • Hope Krebill
  • Sandra Balderrama
  • Cynthia Vinson
Original paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10552-010-9657-8

Cite this article as:
Rochester, P.W., Townsend, J.S., Given, L. et al. Cancer Causes Control (2010) 21: 1967. doi:10.1007/s10552-010-9657-8

Abstract

The potential for Comprehensive Cancer Control (CCC) across the nation has been realized in the last decade with 69 Coalitions developing and implementing CCC plans. Many partners at all levels—national, state, jurisdictional, tribal and communities—have contributed to this success. This article details the contribution of these partners across these various levels, with a selection of the many activities contributing to this success. Consequently the cancer burden, although still of major importance, continues to be addressed in significant ways. Although there are future challenges, CCC coalitions continue to play an important role in addressing the cancer burden.

Keywords

Cancer controlComprehensive cancer control

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Phyllis W. Rochester
    • 1
    • 6
  • Julie S. Townsend
    • 1
  • Leslie Given
    • 2
  • Hope Krebill
    • 3
  • Sandra Balderrama
    • 4
  • Cynthia Vinson
    • 5
  1. 1.Division of Cancer Prevention and ControlCenters for Disease Control and PreventionAtlantaUSA
  2. 2.Strategic Health ConceptsAtlantaUSA
  3. 3.Midwest Cancer AllianceThe University of Kansas Cancer CenterKansas CityUSA
  4. 4.Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas Houston USA
  5. 5.Division of Cancer Control and Population SciencesNational Cancer InstituteBethesdaUSA
  6. 6.PfafftownUSA