Original paper

Cancer Causes & Control

, Volume 21, Issue 12, pp 2113-2122

First online:

Tobacco use cessation and weight management among motor freight workers: results of the gear up for health study

  • Glorian SorensenAffiliated withCenter for Community-Based Research, Dana-Faber Cancer InstituteDepartment of Society, Human Development and Health, Harvard School of Public Health Email author 
  • , Anne StoddardAffiliated withNew England Research Institutes
  • , Lisa QuintilianiAffiliated withCenter for Community-Based Research, Dana-Faber Cancer InstituteDepartment of Society, Human Development and Health, Harvard School of Public HealthBoston Medical Center, Boston University
  • , Cara EbbelingAffiliated withChildren’s Hospital
  • , Eve NaglerAffiliated withCenter for Community-Based Research, Dana-Faber Cancer InstituteDepartment of Society, Human Development and Health, Harvard School of Public Health
  • , May YangAffiliated withNew England Research Institutes
  • , Lesley PereiraAffiliated withCenter for Community-Based Research, Dana-Faber Cancer Institute
  • , Lorraine WallaceAffiliated withCenter for Community-Based Research, Dana-Faber Cancer Institute

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Abstract

Objectives

To present the results of a study of a worksite-based intervention to promote tobacco use cessation and improve weight management among motor freight workers.

Methods

This study used a pre-test/post-test, non-randomized design to assess the effectiveness of a four-month intervention that addressed the social context of the work setting. We evaluated 7-day tobacco quit prevalence among baseline tobacco users, and successful weight management, defined as no weight gain in workers with BMI <25 at baseline and any weight loss among overweight and obese workers.

Results

At baseline, 40% were current tobacco users, and 88% had a BMI of 25 or greater. Of 542 workers invited to participate, 227 agreed to participate and received at least the first telephone call (42%). Ten-month post-baseline, baseline tobacco users who participated in the intervention were more likely to have quit using tobacco than non-participants: 23.8% vs. 9.1% (p = 0.02). There was no significant improvement in weight management.

Conclusions

Incorporating work experiences and job conditions into messages of health behavior change resulted in significant tobacco use cessation among participating motor freight workers.

Keywords

Cancer prevention Tobacco use cessation Weight maintenance Worksite health promotion