Cancer Causes & Control

, Volume 21, Issue 11, pp 1787–1798

Leisure-time physical activity and breast cancer risk by hormone receptor status: effective life periods and exercise intensity

Authors

  • Reiko Suzuki
    • Epidemiology and Prevention Division, Research Center for Cancer Prevention and ScreeningNational Cancer Center
    • Epidemiology and Prevention Division, Research Center for Cancer Prevention and ScreeningNational Cancer Center
  • Yoshio Kasuga
    • Department of SurgeryNagano Matsushiro General Hospital
  • Shiro Yokoyama
    • Department of Breast and Thyroid SurgeryNagano Red Cross Hospital
  • Hiroshi Onuma
    • Department of Breast and Thyroid SurgeryNagano Red Cross Hospital
  • Hideki Nishimura
    • Department of Chest Surgery and Breast SurgeryNagano Municipal Hospital
  • Ritsu Kusama
    • Department of SurgeryNagano Hokushin General Hospital
  • Taichi Shimazu
    • Epidemiology and Prevention Division, Research Center for Cancer Prevention and ScreeningNational Cancer Center
  • Shoichiro Tsugane
    • Epidemiology and Prevention Division, Research Center for Cancer Prevention and ScreeningNational Cancer Center
Original paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10552-010-9605-7

Cite this article as:
Suzuki, R., Iwasaki, M., Kasuga, Y. et al. Cancer Causes Control (2010) 21: 1787. doi:10.1007/s10552-010-9605-7

Abstract

Objective

Physical activity may decrease breast cancer risk. However, it is unclear what intensity of exercise and during which life periods this effect on decreasing risk is efficiently expressed, and whether the associations differ by the estrogen-/progesterone- receptor (ER/PR) status of tumors. We investigated associations between age- and intensity-specific leisure-time physical activity and ER/PR-defined breast cancer risk.

Methods

We conducted a hospital-based case–control study in Nagano, Japan. Subjects were 405 cases newly diagnosed (>99% known ER/PR) from 2001 to 2005, who were age-/area-matched with 405 controls. Activity was assessed with a self-reported questionnaire which considered intensity level (moderate and/or strenuous) at different ages (at 12 and 20 years, and in the previous 5 years). Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals were calculated using logistic regression.

Results

Strenuous but not moderate physical activity at age 12 was inversely associated with pre- and postmenopausal breast cancer risk across ER/PR subtypes [overall OR≥5 days/week vs. none = 0.24 (0.14–0.43)]. Moderate physical activity in the previous 5 years was significantly associated with a decrease in risk for postmenopausal ER + PR + tumors only [OR≥1 day/week vs. none = 0.35 (0.18–0.67)].

Conclusion

Strenuous activity in teens and moderate activity after menopause may contribute to a reduction in breast cancer risk.

Keywords

Breast cancerPhysical activityEstrogen receptorProgesterone receptorRisk

Abbreviations

BMI

Body mass index

CIs

Confidence intervals

ER

Estrogen receptor

FFQ

Food frequency questionnaire

IGF-1

Insulin-like growth factor 1

OC

Oral contraceptives

OR

Odds ratio

PMH

Postmenopausal hormones

PR

Progesterone receptor

SHBG

Sex hormone-binding globulin

SD

Standard deviation

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010