Original paper

Cancer Causes & Control

, Volume 21, Issue 1, pp 171-180

First online:

trans-Fatty acid consumption and its association with distal colorectal cancer in the North Carolina Colon Cancer Study II

  • Lisa C. VinikoorAffiliated withDepartment of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel HillCenter for Gastrointestinal Biology and Disease, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Email author 
  • , Robert C. MillikanAffiliated withDepartment of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • , Jessie A. SatiaAffiliated withDepartment of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel HillCenter for Gastrointestinal Biology and Disease, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel HillDepartment of Nutrition, School of Public Health, University of North Carolina
  • , Jane C. SchroederAffiliated withDepartment of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • , Christopher F. MartinAffiliated withCenter for Gastrointestinal Biology and Disease, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • , Joseph G. IbrahimAffiliated withDepartment of Biostatistics, School of Public Health, University of North Carolina
  • , Robert S. SandlerAffiliated withCenter for Gastrointestinal Biology and Disease, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

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Abstract

Recently, the potential health effects of trans-fatty acid consumption have raised concerns. A few studies have examined the risk of colorectal cancer with increasing consumption of trans-fatty acids, but none investigated the risk of rectal cancer, which may have different risk factors than colon cancer. Our objective was to explore the relationship between trans-fatty acid consumption and distal colorectal (sigmoid, rectosigmoid, and rectal) cancer using a case–control study of Whites (n = 1,516) and African Americans (n = 392) in North Carolina from 2001 to 2006. Matched cases and controls were interviewed about demographic information, lifestyle factors, and diet. White cases reported higher mean consumption of trans-fatty acid than White controls, but mean consumption was similar for African American cases and controls. Relative to the lowest quartile, the highest quartiles of energy-adjusted trans-fatty acid consumption were positively associated with distal colorectal cancer for Whites [adjusted ORs for the third and fourth quartiles are 1.54 (95%CI: 1.12, 2.13) and 1.45 (95%CI: 1.04, 2.03), respectively]. Consumption was not associated with distal colorectal cancer in African Americans [adjusted ORs for the third and fourth quartiles are 0.98 (95%CI: 0.47, 2.05) and 0.87 (95%CI 0.42, 1.81), respectively]. In conclusion, high consumption of trans-fatty acids was positively associated with distal colorectal cancer among Whites.

Keywords

Colorectal neoplasms trans-fatty acids Risk factors Case–control studies