Cancer Causes & Control

, Volume 20, Issue 6, pp 925–933

Dose–response meta-analysis of silica and lung cancer

Authors

    • Centre de recherche, Centre de PneumologieHôpital Laval, Institut universitaire de cardiologie et de pneumologie de l′Université Laval
  • Sylvie Martin
    • Centre de recherche, Centre de PneumologieHôpital Laval, Institut universitaire de cardiologie et de pneumologie de l′Université Laval
  • Dominique Gagné
    • Centre de recherche, Centre de PneumologieHôpital Laval, Institut universitaire de cardiologie et de pneumologie de l′Université Laval
  • Lajmi Lakhal
    • Centre de recherche, Centre de PneumologieHôpital Laval, Institut universitaire de cardiologie et de pneumologie de l′Université Laval
    • Département de mathématiquesUniversité Laval
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10552-009-9296-0

Cite this article as:
Lacasse, Y., Martin, S., Gagné, D. et al. Cancer Causes Control (2009) 20: 925. doi:10.1007/s10552-009-9296-0

Abstract

Objective

To examine the association between occupational exposure to silica and lung cancer from a systematic review (and meta-analysis) of the epidemiologic literature, with special reference to the methodological quality of observational studies.

Methods

We searched Medline, Toxline, BIOSIS, and Embase (1966–December 2007) for original articles published in any language. Observational studies (cohort and case–control studies) were selected if they reported the result of dose–response analyses relating lung cancer to occupational exposure to silica after appropriate adjustment for smoking.

Results

Ten studies (4 cohort studies and 6 case–control studies) met the inclusion criteria of the meta-analysis, nine of which contributing to the main analysis (dose–response analysis, no lag time). We found increasing risk of lung cancer with increasing cumulative exposure to silica, with heterogeneity across studies however. Posthoc analyses identified a set of seven more homogeneous studies. Their meta-analysis resulted in a dose–response curve that was not different from that obtained in the main analysis.

Conclusion

Silica is a lung carcinogen. This increased risk is particularly apparent when the cumulative exposure to silica is well beyond that resulting from exposure to the recommended limit concentration for a prolonged period of time.

Keywords

Silica Pulmonary fibrosis Lung neoplasm Systematic review Meta-analysis

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009