Cancer Causes & Control

, Volume 18, Issue 8, pp 895–908

Occupation and keratinocyte cancer risk: a population-based case–control study

  • Josh Marehbian
  • Joanne S. Colt
  • Dalsu Baris
  • Patricia Stewart
  • Therese A. Stukel
  • Steven K. Spencer
  • Margaret R. Karagas
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10552-007-9034-4

Cite this article as:
Marehbian, J., Colt, J.S., Baris, D. et al. Cancer Causes Control (2007) 18: 895. doi:10.1007/s10552-007-9034-4

Abstract

Objective

The aim of our study was to identify occupations associated with increased risk of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC).

Methods

We conducted a population-based case–control study of BCC and SCC in New Hampshire. Cases (n = 599 BCC, n = 290 SCC) and controls (n = 524) completed a self-administered residence and work history questionnaire and personal interview regarding major risk factors for skin cancer. Reported jobs were coded using the Standardized Occupational Classification system (SOC). Odds ratios (ORs) and confidence intervals (CIs) for BCC and SCC were calculated for men and women separately using unconditional logistic regression models taking into account age, education, skin reaction to sun, history of painful sunburns, time spent outdoors, and for SCC, smoking.

Results

Among men, we observed elevated risks of both BCC and SCC among groundskeepers and gardeners, except farm (SOC 5622). We also found that garage and service station-related occupations (SOCs 873) and to some extent food/beverage preparation/service occupations (SOC 521) were associated with BCC risk among men. Women in health services occupations (SOC 523) had elevated risks for both tumors, especially for BCC. Additionally, administrative support (SOC 46/47) occupations were related to BCC risk among women. Other occupations were associated with excess risks, but without consistent trends by duration of employment.

Conclusion

We observed several occupations associated with elevated BCC and SCC risk. These results resemble reported findings for cutaneous melanoma and are generally consistent with the few available studies on keratinocyte cancers.

Keywords

Keratinocyte cancerBasal cell carcinomaSquamous cell carcinoma

Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media B.V. 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Josh Marehbian
    • 1
  • Joanne S. Colt
    • 2
  • Dalsu Baris
    • 2
  • Patricia Stewart
    • 2
  • Therese A. Stukel
    • 3
  • Steven K. Spencer
    • 4
  • Margaret R. Karagas
    • 1
    • 5
  1. 1.Center for the Evaluative Clinical Sciences, Dartmouth Medical SchoolDartmouth CollegeHanoverUSA
  2. 2.Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Department of Health and Human Services, National Cancer InstituteNational Institutes of HealthBethesdaUSA
  3. 3.Institute for Clinical Evaluative SciencesTorontoCanada
  4. 4.Section of Dermatology, Department of Medicine, Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center, and the Norris Cotton Cancer CenterDartmouth Medical SchoolHanoverUSA
  5. 5.Section of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Department of Community and Family Medicine, the Norris Cotton Cancer Center, and the Center for Environmental Health Sciences, Dartmouth Medical SchoolDartmouth CollegeHanoverUSA