Cancer Causes & Control

, Volume 18, Issue 7, pp 705–711

Prospective case–control study of nonfatal cancer preceding the diagnosis of parkinson’s disease

  • Jane A. Driver
  • Tobias Kurth
  • Julie E. Buring
  • J. Michael Gaziano
  • Giancarlo Logroscino
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10552-007-9005-9

Cite this article as:
Driver, J.A., Kurth, T., Buring, J.E. et al. Cancer Causes Control (2007) 18: 705. doi:10.1007/s10552-007-9005-9

Abstract

Objective

Prior studies suggest a decreased frequency of cancer in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD). We conducted a nested case–control study to estimate the association between the diagnosis of PD and a history of preceding cancer.

Methods

Our case–control study was nested within a prospective cohort of 22,071 US male physicians. During 22 years of follow-up, 487 incident cases of PD were identified and matched by age to 487 controls. We then evaluated a history of cancer prior to the index date that was confirmed by medical record review.

Results

The frequency of any cancer was less in cases (13.1%) than in controls (14.8%). There was an inverse relationship between overall cancer (odds ratio [OR] = 0.83; 95% CI, 0.57–1.21), smoking-related (OR = 0.74; 95% CI, 0.35–1.57), and non-smoking-related cancer (OR = 0.88; 95% CI, 0.59–1.32) and the subsequent development of PD. Smoking significantly modified the relationship between PD and smoking-related cancer (pinteraction = 0.002). PD cases who smoked had an OR of 0.32 (95% CI, 0.11–0.89) for smoking-related cancer. In contrast, PD cases who never smoked had an OR of 6.85 (95% CI, 0.83–56.39).

Conclusions

Our data suggest that the frequency of cancer preceding the diagnosis of PD is decreased. Smoking status prior to PD or cancer diagnosis significantly modified the association between smoking-related cancer and PD.

Keywords

CancerParkinson’s diseaseEtiologyRiskCase–control studies

Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media B.V. 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jane A. Driver
    • 1
  • Tobias Kurth
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Julie E. Buring
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • J. Michael Gaziano
    • 1
    • 2
    • 5
  • Giancarlo Logroscino
    • 1
    • 3
  1. 1.Division of Aging, Department of MedicineBrigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA
  2. 2.Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of MedicineBrigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA
  3. 3.Department of EpidemiologyHarvard School of Public HealthBostonUSA
  4. 4.Department of Ambulatory Care and PreventionHarvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA
  5. 5.Massachusetts Veterans Epidemiology Research and Information CenterBostonUSA