Cancer Causes & Control

, Volume 18, Issue 4, pp 399–413

Anthropometric factors and risk of endometrial cancer: the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition

  • Christine Friedenreich
  • Anne Cust
  • Petra H. Lahmann
  • Karen Steindorf
  • Marie-Christine Boutron-Ruault
  • Françoise Clavel-Chapelon
  • Sylvie Mesrine
  • Jakob Linseisen
  • Sabine Rohrmann
  • Heiner Boeing
  • Tobias Pischon
  • Anne Tjønneland
  • Jytte Halkjær
  • Kim Overvad
  • Michelle Mendez
  • M. L. Redondo
  • Carmen Martinez Garcia
  • Nerea Larrañaga
  • María-José Tormo
  • Aurelio Barricarte Gurrea
  • Sheila Bingham
  • Kay-Tee Khaw
  • Naomi Allen
  • Tim Key
  • Antonia Trichopoulou
  • Effie Vasilopoulou
  • Dimitrios Trichopoulos
  • Valeria Pala
  • Domenico Palli
  • Rosario Tumino
  • Amalia Mattiello
  • Paolo Vineis
  • H. Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita
  • Petra H. M. Peeters
  • Göran Berglund
  • Jonas Manjer
  • Eva Lundin
  • Annekatrin Lukanova
  • Nadia Slimani
  • Mazda Jenab
  • Rudolf Kaaks
  • Elio Riboli
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10552-006-0113-8

Cite this article as:
Friedenreich, C., Cust, A., Lahmann, P.H. et al. Cancer Causes Control (2007) 18: 399. doi:10.1007/s10552-006-0113-8

Abstract

Objective

To examine the association between anthropometry and endometrial cancer, particularly by menopausal status and exogenous hormone use subgroups.

Methods

Among 223,008 women in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study, there were 567 incident endometrial cancer cases during 6.4 years of follow-up. The analysis was performed with Cox proportional hazards modeling.

Results

Weight, body mass index (BMI), waist and hip circumferences and waist–hip ratio (WHR) were strongly associated with increased risk of endometrial cancer. The relative risk (RR) for obese (BMI 30– < 40 kg/m2) compared to normal weight (BMI < 25) women was 1.78, 95% CI = 1.41–2.26, and for morbidly obese women (BMI ≥ 40) was 3.02, 95% CI = 1.66–5.52. The RR for women with a waist circumference of ≥88 cm vs. <80 cm was 1.76, 95% CI = 1.42–2.19. Adult weight gain of ≥20 kg compared with stable weight (±3 kg) increased risk independent of body weight at age 20 (RR = 1.75, 95% CI = 1.11–2.77). These associations were generally stronger for postmenopausal than premenopausal women, and oral contraceptives never-users than ever-users, and much stronger among never-users of hormone replacement therapy compared to ever-users.

Conclusion

Obesity, abdominal adiposity, and adult weight gain were strongly associated with endometrial cancer risk. These associations were particularly evident among never-users of hormone replacement therapy.

Keywords

Anthropometry Endometrial cancer Etiology Risk factors Obesity Adiposity Mechanisms Hormone replacement therapy 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christine Friedenreich
    • 1
  • Anne Cust
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • Petra H. Lahmann
    • 5
  • Karen Steindorf
    • 6
  • Marie-Christine Boutron-Ruault
    • 7
  • Françoise Clavel-Chapelon
    • 7
  • Sylvie Mesrine
    • 7
  • Jakob Linseisen
    • 8
  • Sabine Rohrmann
    • 8
  • Heiner Boeing
    • 5
  • Tobias Pischon
    • 5
  • Anne Tjønneland
    • 9
  • Jytte Halkjær
    • 9
  • Kim Overvad
    • 10
  • Michelle Mendez
    • 11
  • M. L. Redondo
    • 12
  • Carmen Martinez Garcia
    • 13
  • Nerea Larrañaga
    • 14
  • María-José Tormo
    • 15
  • Aurelio Barricarte Gurrea
    • 16
  • Sheila Bingham
    • 17
  • Kay-Tee Khaw
    • 18
  • Naomi Allen
    • 19
  • Tim Key
    • 19
  • Antonia Trichopoulou
    • 20
  • Effie Vasilopoulou
    • 20
  • Dimitrios Trichopoulos
    • 21
  • Valeria Pala
    • 22
  • Domenico Palli
    • 23
  • Rosario Tumino
    • 24
  • Amalia Mattiello
    • 25
  • Paolo Vineis
    • 26
    • 27
  • H. Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita
    • 28
  • Petra H. M. Peeters
    • 29
  • Göran Berglund
    • 30
  • Jonas Manjer
    • 31
  • Eva Lundin
    • 32
  • Annekatrin Lukanova
    • 33
    • 34
  • Nadia Slimani
    • 2
  • Mazda Jenab
    • 2
  • Rudolf Kaaks
    • 2
    • 8
  • Elio Riboli
    • 2
    • 27
  1. 1.Division of Population Health and InformationAlberta Cancer BoardCalgaryCanada
  2. 2.Nutrition and Hormones UnitInternational Agency for Research on CancerLyonFrance
  3. 3.School of Public HealthUniversity of SydneySydneyAustralia
  4. 4.Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1LyonFrance
  5. 5.Department of EpidemiologyGerman Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-RehbrueckeNuthetalGermany
  6. 6.Unit of Environmental EpidemiologyGerman Cancer Research CentreHeidelbergGermany
  7. 7.INSERM U ERI20Institut Gustave RoussyVillejuifFrance
  8. 8.Division of Clinical EpidemiologyGerman Cancer Research CentreHeidelbergGermany
  9. 9.Institute of Cancer EpidemiologyDanish Cancer SocietyCopenhagenDenmark
  10. 10.Department of Clinical EpidemiologyAalborg Hospital, Aarhus University HospitalAalborgDenmark
  11. 11.Department of EpidemiologyCatalan Institute of Oncology, IDIBELLBarcelonaSpain
  12. 12.Public Health and Health Planning DirectorateAsturiasSpain
  13. 13.Escuela Andaluza de Salud PublicaGranadaSpain
  14. 14.Department of Public Health of GuipuzkoaSan SebastianSpain
  15. 15.Department of EpidemiologyHealth Council of MurciaMurciaSpain
  16. 16.Public Health Institute of NavarraPamplonaSpain
  17. 17.MRC Centre for Nutrition and Cancer Prevention and SurvivalUniversity of CambridgeCambridgeUK
  18. 18.Department of Public Health and Primary Care, School of Clinical MedicineUniversity of CambridgeCambridgeUK
  19. 19.Cancer Research UK Epidemiology UnitUniversity of OxfordOxfordUK
  20. 20.Department of Hygiene and Epidemiology, School of MedicineUniversity of AthensAthensGreece
  21. 21.Hellenic Health FoundationAthensGreece
  22. 22.Epidemiology UnitNational Cancer InstituteMilanItaly
  23. 23.Molecular and Nutritional Epidemiology UnitCSPO–Scientific Institute of TuscanyFlorenceItaly
  24. 24.Cancer RegistryAzienda Ospedaliera “Civile M.P. Arezzo”RagusaItaly
  25. 25.Dipartimento di Medicina Clinica e SperimentaleUniversità di NapoliNaplesItaly
  26. 26.University of TorinoTurinItaly
  27. 27.Department of Epidemiology and Public HealthImperial CollegeLondonUK
  28. 28.National Institute of Public Health and the EnvironmentBilthovenThe Netherlands
  29. 29.Julius Centre for Health Sciences and Primary CareUniversity Medical CentreUtrechtThe Netherlands
  30. 30.Department of Clinical SciencesMalmö University Hospital, Lund UniversityMalmoSweden
  31. 31.Department of Surgery, Malmö University HospitalLund UniversityMalmoSweden
  32. 32.Department of Medical Biosciences, PathologyUniversity of UmeåUmeaSweden
  33. 33.Department of Obstetrics and GynecologyNYU School of MedicineNew YorkUSA
  34. 34.Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine/Nutritional ResearchUniversity of UmeåUmeaSweden

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