Cancer Causes & Control

, Volume 17, Issue 3, pp 273–285

A Pooled Analysis of 12 Cohort Studies of Dietary Fat, Cholesterol and Egg Intake and Ovarian Cancer

  • Jeanine M. Genkinger
  • David J. Hunter
  • Donna Spiegelman
  • Kristin E. Anderson
  • W. Lawrence Beeson
  • Julie E. Buring
  • Graham A. Colditz
  • Gary E. Fraser
  • Jo L. Freudenheim
  • R. Alexandra Goldbohm
  • Susan E. Hankinson
  • Karen L. Koenig
  • Susanna C. Larsson
  • Michael Leitzmann
  • Marjorie L. McCullough
  • Anthony B. Miller
  • Carmen Rodriguez
  • Thomas E. Rohan
  • Julie A. Ross
  • Arthur Schatzkin
  • Leo J. Schouten
  • Ellen Smit
  • Walter C. Willett
  • Alicja Wolk
  • Anne Zeleniuch-Jacquotte
  • Shumin M. Zhang
  • Stephanie A. Smith-Warner
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10552-005-0455-7

Cite this article as:
Genkinger, J.M., Hunter, D.J., Spiegelman, D. et al. Cancer Causes Control (2006) 17: 273. doi:10.1007/s10552-005-0455-7

Abstract

Fat and cholesterol are theorized to promote ovarian carcinogenesis by increasing circulating estrogen levels. Although case–control studies have reported positive associations between total and saturated fat intake and ovarian cancer risk, two cohort studies have observed null associations. Dietary cholesterol and eggs have been positively associated with ovarian cancer risk. A pooled analysis was conducted on 12 cohort studies. Among 523,217 women, 2,132 incident epithelial ovarian cancer cases were identified. Study-specific relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated by Cox proportional hazards models, and then pooled using a random effects model. Total fat intake was not associated with ovarian cancer risk (pooled multivariate RR = 1.08, 95% CI 0.86–1.34 comparing ≥45 to 30–<35% of calories). No association was observed for monounsaturated, polyunsaturated, trans-unsaturated, animal and vegetable fat, cholesterol and egg intakes with ovarian cancer risk. A weakly positive, but non-linear association, was observed for saturated fat intake (pooled multivariate RR = 1.29, 95% CI: 1.01–1.66 comparing highest versus lowest decile). Results for histologic subtypes were similar. Overall, fat, cholesterol and egg intakes were not associated with ovarian cancer risk. The positive association for saturated fat intake at very high intakes merits further investigation.

Keywords

Diet Fat Cholesterol Egg Ovarian cancer 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jeanine M. Genkinger
    • 1
  • David J. Hunter
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Donna Spiegelman
    • 5
  • Kristin E. Anderson
    • 6
  • W. Lawrence Beeson
    • 7
  • Julie E. Buring
    • 2
    • 8
  • Graham A. Colditz
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • Gary E. Fraser
    • 7
  • Jo L. Freudenheim
    • 9
  • R. Alexandra Goldbohm
    • 10
  • Susan E. Hankinson
    • 2
    • 3
  • Karen L. Koenig
    • 11
  • Susanna C. Larsson
    • 12
  • Michael Leitzmann
    • 13
  • Marjorie L. McCullough
    • 14
  • Anthony B. Miller
    • 15
  • Carmen Rodriguez
    • 14
  • Thomas E. Rohan
    • 16
  • Julie A. Ross
    • 6
  • Arthur Schatzkin
    • 13
  • Leo J. Schouten
    • 17
  • Ellen Smit
    • 9
  • Walter C. Willett
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Alicja Wolk
    • 12
  • Anne Zeleniuch-Jacquotte
    • 11
  • Shumin M. Zhang
    • 2
    • 8
  • Stephanie A. Smith-Warner
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of NutritionHarvard School of Public HealthBostonUSA
  2. 2.Department of EpidemiologyHarvard School of Public HealthBostonUSA
  3. 3.Channing Laboratory, Department of MedicineBrigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA
  4. 4.Harvard Center for Cancer PreventionHarvard School of Public HealthBostonUSA
  5. 5.Department of BiostatisticsHarvard School of Public HealthBostonUSA
  6. 6.Division of Epidemiology, School of Public HealthUniversity of MinnesotaMinneapolisUSA
  7. 7.The Center for Health ResearchLoma Linda University School of MedicineLoma LindaUSA
  8. 8.Division of Preventive MedicineBrigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA
  9. 9.Department of Social and Preventive MedicineUniversity at Buffalo, State University of New YorkBuffaloUSA
  10. 10.Department of Food and Chemical Risk AnalysisTNO Quality of LifeZeistThe Netherlands
  11. 11.Department of Environmental Medicine, Division of EpidemiologyNew York UniversityNew YorkUSA
  12. 12.Division of Nutritional Epidemiology, National Institute of Environmental MedicineKarolinska InstituteStockholmSweden
  13. 13.Division of Cancer Epidemiology and GeneticsNational Cancer Institute, NIH, DHHSBethesdaUSA
  14. 14.Epidemiology and Surveillance ResearchAmerican Cancer SocietyAtlantaUSA
  15. 15.Department of Public Health Sciences, Faculty of MedicineUniversity of TorontoTorontoCanada
  16. 16.Department of Epidemiology and Population HealthAlbert Einstein College of MedicineBronxUSA
  17. 17.Department of EpidemiologyMaastricht UniversityMaastrichtThe Netherlands