Cancer Causes & Control

, Volume 17, Issue 1, pp 11–19

Pregnancy History and Incidence of Melanoma in Women: A Pooled Analysis

  • Margaret R. Karagas
  • Michael S. Zens
  • Therese A. Stukel
  • Anthony J. Swerdlow
  • Stefano Rosso
  • Anne Osterlind
  • Thomas Mack
  • Connie Kirkpatrick
  • Elizabeth A. Holly
  • Adele Green
  • Richard Gallagher
  • J. Mark Elwood
  • Bruce K. Armstrong
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10552-005-0281-y

Cite this article as:
Karagas, M.R., Zens, M.S., Stukel, T.A. et al. Cancer Causes Control (2006) 17: 11. doi:10.1007/s10552-005-0281-y

Abstract

There is evidence that pregnancy history including age at first birth and parity may play a role in risk of cutaneous melanoma in women, although, epidemiological findings are inconsistent. We conducted a collaborative analysis of these factors using the original data from ten completed case–control studies (2391 cases and 3199 controls), and assessed the potential confounding effects of socioeconomic, pigmentary, and sun exposure-related factors. We found no overall association with ever having a live birth (pooled odds ratio (pOR) 0.95, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.67–1.35). However, we detected a reduced risk of melanoma among women with higher parity (≥5 versus no live births pOR 0.76, 95% CI 0.49–1.18, each live birth pOR 0.95, 95% CI 0.91–0.99, p trend = 0.05). Women with both earlier age at first birth (e.g., <20 years) and higher parity (e.g., ≥5 live births) had a particularly lower risk than women with later age at first birth (e.g., ≥25 years) and lower parity (e.g., <5 live births) (pOR 0.33, 95% CI 0.14–0.75). The results are compatible with an effect of reproductive history-related factors on melanoma risk, but also could reflect differences in other factors, such as sun exposure history.

Keywords

Case–control studiesData pooling MelanomaParity

Abbreviations

OR

odds ratio

pOR

pooled odds ratio

CI

confidence interval

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Margaret R. Karagas
    • 1
  • Michael S. Zens
    • 1
  • Therese A. Stukel
    • 2
  • Anthony J. Swerdlow
    • 3
  • Stefano Rosso
    • 4
  • Anne Osterlind
    • 5
  • Thomas Mack
    • 6
  • Connie Kirkpatrick
    • 7
  • Elizabeth A. Holly
    • 8
  • Adele Green
    • 9
  • Richard Gallagher
    • 10
  • J. Mark Elwood
    • 11
  • Bruce K. Armstrong
    • 12
  1. 1.Section of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Department of Community and Family MedicineDartmouth Medical SchoolHanover, LebanonUSA
  2. 2.Institute for Clinical Evaluative SciencesTorontoCanada
  3. 3.Section of Epidemiology Institute of Cancer ResearchSuttonUK
  4. 4.Registro Tumori PiemonteVia San Francesco Da PaolaTorinoItaly
  5. 5.Dermatology clinic HillerødDenmark
  6. 6.Norris Comprehensive Cancer CenterUniversity of Southern CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA
  7. 7.Good Samaritan HospitalPuyallup WAUSA
  8. 8.Cancer Epidemiology StudiesSan FranciscoUSA
  9. 9.Queensland Institute of Medical ResearchPO Royal Brisbane HospitalBrisbaneAustralia
  10. 10.Section of EpidemiologyCancer Control Agency of British ColumbiaVancouverCanada
  11. 11.Cancer Research and RegistersNew South Wales Cancer CouncilKings CrossAustralia
  12. 12.The University of SydneyEdward Ford Building A27Australia