Article

Journal of Business Ethics

, Volume 55, Issue 4, pp 371-384

Religious Intensity, Evangelical Christianity, and Business Ethics: An Empirical Study

  • Justin G. LongeneckerAffiliated withHankamer School of Business, Baylor University Email author 
  • , Joseph A. McKinneyAffiliated withHankamer School of Business, Baylor University
  • , Carlos W. MooreAffiliated withHankamer School of Business, Baylor University

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Abstract

Research on the relationship between religious commitment and business ethics has produced widely varying results and made the impact of such commitment unclear. This study presents an empirical investigation based on a questionnaire survey of business managers and professionals in the United States yielding a database of 1234 respondents. Respondents evaluated the ethical acceptability of 16 business decisions. Findings varied with the way in which the religion variable was measured. Little relationship between religious commitment and ethical judgment was found when responses were compared on the basis of broad faith categories – Catholic, Protestant, Jewish, other religions, and no religion. However, respondents who indicated that religious interests were of high or moderate importance to them demonstrated a higher level of ethical judgment (less accepting of unethical decisions) than others in their evaluations. Evangelical Christians also showed a higher level of ethical judgment.

Keywords

business ethics ethical issues ethical judgment evangelical christian interactionist perspective religious beliefs religion and business ethics religion and religious commitment religious traditions