Breast Cancer Research and Treatment

, Volume 146, Issue 2, pp 355–363

Differential impact of body mass index on absolute and percent breast density: implications regarding their use as breast cancer risk biomarkers

  • Susann E. Schetter
  • Terryl J. Hartman
  • Jason Liao
  • John P. Richie
  • Bogdan Prokopczyk
  • Cindy DuBrock
  • Carina Signori
  • Christopher Hamilton
  • Laurence M. Demers
  • Karam El-Bayoumy
  • Andrea Manni
Clinical trial

DOI: 10.1007/s10549-014-3031-6

Cite this article as:
Schetter, S.E., Hartman, T.J., Liao, J. et al. Breast Cancer Res Treat (2014) 146: 355. doi:10.1007/s10549-014-3031-6

Abstract

Percent breast density (PBD), a commonly used biomarker of breast cancer risk (BCR), is confounded by the influence of non-dense breast tissue on its measurement and factors, such as BMI, which have an impact on non-dense tissue. Consequently, BMI, a potent BCR factor, is, paradoxically, negatively correlated with PBD. We propose that absolute breast density (ABD) is a more accurate biomarker of BCR. We used a volumetric method to compare the correlation between PBD and ABD with baseline demographics and dietary and physical activity variables in a group of 169 postmenopausal women enrolled in a clinical trial prior to any intervention. As expected, a strong negative correlation between PBD and BMI was observed (Rho = −0.5, p < 5e−12). In contrast, we observed a strong, previously not well established, positive correlation of BMI with ABD (Rho = 0.41, p < 2.5e−8), which supports the use of ABD as a more accurate indicator of BCR. Correction of PBD by BMI did not frequently provide the same information as ABD. In addition, because of the strong influence of BMI on ABD, many correlations between dietary variables and ABD did not emerge, until adjustment was made for BMI. ABD corrected by BMI should be the gold standard BD measurement. These findings identify the optimal measurement of BD when testing the influence of an intervention on BD as a biomarker of BCR.

Keywords

Percent versus absolute breast density Breast density and BMI Dietary variables and breast density Physical activity and breast density 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Susann E. Schetter
    • 1
  • Terryl J. Hartman
    • 4
  • Jason Liao
    • 2
  • John P. Richie
    • 2
  • Bogdan Prokopczyk
    • 3
  • Cindy DuBrock
    • 5
  • Carina Signori
    • 6
  • Christopher Hamilton
    • 7
  • Laurence M. Demers
    • 7
  • Karam El-Bayoumy
    • 8
  • Andrea Manni
    • 6
  1. 1.Departments of RadiologyPennsylvania State University College of MedicineHersheyUSA
  2. 2.Departments of Public Health SciencesPennsylvania State University College of MedicineHersheyUSA
  3. 3.Departments of PharmacologyPennsylvania State University College of MedicineHersheyUSA
  4. 4.Emory University Rollins School of Public HealthAtlantaUSA
  5. 5.Cancer InstitutePennsylvania State University College of MedicineHersheyUSA
  6. 6.Departments of MedicinePennsylvania State University College of MedicineHersheyUSA
  7. 7.Departments of PathologyPennsylvania State University College of MedicineHersheyUSA
  8. 8.Departments of Biochemistry and Molecular BiologyPennsylvania State University College of MedicineHersheyUSA