, Volume 140, Issue 3, pp 587-601
Date: 03 Aug 2013

Associations with growth factor genes (FGF1, FGF2, PDGFB, FGFR2, NRG2, EGF, ERBB2) with breast cancer risk and survival: the Breast Cancer Health Disparities Study

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Abstract

Growth factors (GF) stimulate cell proliferation through binding to cell membrane receptors and are thought to be involved in cancer risk and survival. We examined how genetic variation in epidermal growth factor (EGF), neuregulin 2 (NRG2), ERBB2 (HER2/neu), fibroblast growth factors 1 and 2 (FGF1 and FGF2) and its receptor 2 (FGFR2), and platelet-derived growth factor B (PDGFB) independently and collectively influence breast cancer risk and survival. We analyzed data from the Breast Cancer Health Disparities Study which includes Hispanic (2,111 cases, 2,597 controls) and non-Hispanic white (1,481 cases, 1,586 controls) women. Adaptive rank-truncated product (ARTP) analysis was conducted to determine gene significance. Odds ratios (OR) and 95 % confidence intervals were obtained from conditional logistic regression models to estimate breast cancer risk and Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) of dying from breast cancer. We assessed Native American (NA) ancestry using 104 ancestry informative markers. We observed few significant associations with breast cancer risk overall or by menopausal status other than for FGFR2 rs2981582. This SNP was significantly associated with ER+/PR+ (OR 1.66, 95 % CI 1.37–2.00) and ER+/PR− (OR 1.54, 95 % CI 1.03–2.31) tumors. Multiple SNPs in FGF1, FGF2, and NRG2 significantly interacted with multiple SNPs in EGFR, ERBB2, FGFR2, and PDGFB, suggesting that breast cancer risk is dependent on the collective effects of genetic variants in other GFs. Both FGF1 and ERBB2 significantly influenced overall survival, especially among women with low levels of NA ancestry (P ARTP = 0.007 and 0.003, respectively). Our findings suggest that genetic variants in growth factors signaling appear to influence breast cancer risk through their combined effects. Genetic variation in ERBB2 and FGF1 appear to be associated with survival after diagnosis with breast cancer.