Breast Cancer Research and Treatment

, Volume 137, Issue 2, pp 373–382

MicroRNA-30c targets cytoskeleton genes involved in breast cancer cell invasion

Authors

  • Jessica Bockhorn
    • The Ben May Department for Cancer ResearchThe University of Chicago
    • Department of Biochemistry and Molecular BiologyThe University of Chicago
  • Kathy Yee
    • The Ben May Department for Cancer ResearchThe University of Chicago
  • Ya-Fang Chang
    • The Ben May Department for Cancer ResearchThe University of Chicago
  • Aleix Prat
    • Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer CenterThe University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
    • Translational Genomics GroupVall D′Hebron Institute of Oncology (VHIO)
  • Dezheng Huo
    • Department of Health StudiesThe University of Chicago
  • Chika Nwachukwu
    • Center for Clinical Cancer Genetics, Department of MedicineThe University of Chicago
  • Rachel Dalton
    • The Ben May Department for Cancer ResearchThe University of Chicago
  • Simo Huang
    • The Ben May Department for Cancer ResearchThe University of Chicago
  • Kaitlin E. Swanson
    • The Ben May Department for Cancer ResearchThe University of Chicago
  • Charles M. Perou
    • Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer CenterThe University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Olufunmilayo I. Olopade
    • Center for Clinical Cancer Genetics, Department of MedicineThe University of Chicago
  • Michael F. Clarke
    • The Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative MedicineStanford University
    • The Ben May Department for Cancer ResearchThe University of Chicago
    • The Ben May Department for Cancer ResearchThe University of Chicago
    • The Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative MedicineStanford University
Preclinical study

DOI: 10.1007/s10549-012-2346-4

Cite this article as:
Bockhorn, J., Yee, K., Chang, Y. et al. Breast Cancer Res Treat (2013) 137: 373. doi:10.1007/s10549-012-2346-4

Abstract

Metastasis remains a significant challenge in treating cancer. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying metastasis is needed to develop more effective treatments. Here, we show that human breast tumor biomarker miR-30c regulates invasion by targeting the cytoskeleton network genes encoding twinfilin 1 (TWF1) and vimentin (VIM). Both VIM and TWF1 have been shown to regulate epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Similar to TWF1, VIM also regulates F-actin formation, a key component of cellular transition to a more invasive mesenchymal phenotype. To further characterize the role of the TWF1 pathway in breast cancer, we found that IL-11 is an important target of TWF1 that regulates breast cancer cell invasion and STAT3 phosphorylation. The miR-30c-VIM/TWF1 signaling cascade is also associated with clinical outcome in breast cancer patients.

Keywords

miR-30cBreast tumor invasionTWF1VIMIL-11

Supplementary material

10549_2012_2346_MOESM1_ESM.pdf (374 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (PDF 374 kb)

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2012