Breast Cancer Research and Treatment

, Volume 129, Issue 1, pp 211–219

Differential expression of prognostic biomarkers between interval and screen-detected breast cancers: does age or family history matter?

  • Jan T. Lowery
  • Tim Byers
  • John Kittelson
  • John E. Hokanson
  • Judy Mouchawar
  • John Lewin
  • Dan Merrick
  • Lisa Hines
  • Meenakshi Singh
Epidemiology

DOI: 10.1007/s10549-011-1448-8

Cite this article as:
Lowery, J.T., Byers, T., Kittelson, J. et al. Breast Cancer Res Treat (2011) 129: 211. doi:10.1007/s10549-011-1448-8

Abstract

The aim of this study was to compare tumor expression of prognostic biomarkers between interval breast cancers and screen-detected breast cancers overall, and according to age at diagnosis and familial risk. Tissue micro-arrays were constructed from 98 breast cancers (47 interval and 51 screen-detected) diagnosed in women in the Cancer Genetics Network. Arrays were immuno-stained to compare protein expression of six biomarkers including estrogen and progesterone receptor (ER/PR), Her2/neu, EGFR, cytokeratin 5/6, and Ki67. Fisher’s Exact test was used to compare expression between interval and screen-detected cancers. Interval cancers were larger (P = 0.04), higher stage (P < 0.001), and more likely to have lobular histology (P = 0.01) than screen-detected cancers. Overall, interval cancers more often overexpressed EGFR (P = 0.01) and were somewhat more likely to be ER− (55% vs. 43%, P = 0.3), and triple negative (ER−/PR−/Her2−) (21 vs. 12%, P = 0.26). A greater difference in the proportion of interval versus screen-detected tumors that were ER− (53 vs. 35%; P = 0.29), PR− (35 vs. 21%; P = 0.25) and EGFR+ (17 vs. 0%; P = 0.02) was evident among women over 50. There was a trend toward differential expression among women with familial risk for PR− (P = 0.005) and triple negative status (P = 0.02). This study provides new data indicating that EGFR may be important in the etiology of interval cancer and be a possible therapeutic target. Our data also suggest that biological differences between interval and screen-detected cancers are more defined in older women. Future studies to confirm this finding and to elucidate novel markers for characterizing interval cancers may be more beneficial to this subgroup.

Keywords

Interval breast cancer Biomarkers Tissue micro-arrays 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jan T. Lowery
    • 1
  • Tim Byers
    • 1
  • John Kittelson
    • 1
  • John E. Hokanson
    • 1
  • Judy Mouchawar
    • 2
  • John Lewin
    • 3
  • Dan Merrick
    • 4
  • Lisa Hines
    • 5
  • Meenakshi Singh
    • 6
  1. 1.Colorado School of Public HealthUniversity of Colorado DenverAuroraUSA
  2. 2.Kaiser PermanenteAuroraUSA
  3. 3.Diversified Radiology of ColoradoDenverUSA
  4. 4.Department of PathologyVeterans Administration Medical CenterDenverUSA
  5. 5.University of ColoradoColorado SpringsUSA
  6. 6.Department of Pathology, Stony Brook University Medical CenterState University of New York at Stony BrookStony BrookUSA