Epidemiology

Breast Cancer Research and Treatment

, Volume 128, Issue 2, pp 467-472

Current evidence on the relationship between HRAS1 polymorphism and breast cancer risk: a meta-analysis

  • Chun ZhangAffiliated withDepartment of General Surgery, The Third Affiliated Hospital to Nantong UniversityDepartment of Intensive Care Unite, The Third Affiliated Hospital to Nantong University
  • , Guo-Qiang LvAffiliated withDepartment of General Surgery, The Third Affiliated Hospital to Nantong University
  • , Xian-Ming YuAffiliated withDepartment of General Surgery, The Third Affiliated Hospital to Nantong University
  • , Yuan-Long GuAffiliated withDepartment of General Surgery, The Third Affiliated Hospital to Nantong University
  • , Jian-Ping LiAffiliated withDepartment of General Surgery, The Third Affiliated Hospital to Nantong University
  • , Liang-Feng DuAffiliated withDepartment of Intensive Care Unite, The Third Affiliated Hospital to Nantong University
  • , Ping ZhouAffiliated withDepartment of Intensive Care Unite, The Third Affiliated Hospital to Nantong University Email author 

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Abstract

Rare alleles at the HRAS1 variable number of tandem repeats (VNTRs) locus have been implicated in breast cancer risk. Although many studies have showed that rare HRAS1 alleles may be associated with breast cancer risk, this relationship remains controversial. A meta-analysis was conducted to investigate the potential association between rare HRAS1 alleles and breast cancer risk. A database search found a total of 13 studies involving 1926 breast cancer cases and 2800 controls. Crude odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were used to test the strength of association. When all the studies were combined into the meta-analysis, we found that breast cancer cases had a significantly higher frequency of rare alleles (OR = 2.03, 95% CI = 1.34, 3.10). In the subgroup analysis by race, we found that breast cancer cases had a significantly higher frequency of rare alleles (OR = 2.14, 95% CI = 1.37, 3.36) among Caucasians. In the subgroup analysis by study design, we found that breast cancer cases had a significantly higher frequency of rare alleles (OR = 2.47, 95% CI = 1.62, 3.79) among groups with hospital-based controls. In conclusion, this meta-analysis suggested that rare alleles at the HRAS1 VNTRs may contribute to breast cancer susceptibility. More population-based case–control studies were needed especially in Asians in the future.

Keywords

HRAS1 Breast cancer Polymorphism Meta-analysis