, Volume 123, Issue 3, pp 877-883
Date: 24 Feb 2010

NAT2 polymorphisms combining with smoking associated with breast cancer susceptibility: a meta-analysis

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Abstract

To derive a more precise estimation of the relationship between the slow or rapid acetylation resulting from N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) polymorphisms and breast cancer risk, a meta-analysis was performed. PubMed, Medline, Embase, and Web of Science were searched. Crude odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to assess strength of association. The pooled ORs were performed for slow versus rapid acetylation genotypes. A total of 26 studies including 9,215 cases and 10,443 controls were included in the meta-analysis. Overall, no significantly elevated breast cancer risk was associated with NAT2 slow genotypes when all studies were pooled into the meta-analysis (OR = 1.026, 95% CI = 0.968–1.087). In the subgroup analysis by ethnicity, increased risks were not found for either Caucasians (OR = 1.001, 95% CI = 0.938–1.068) or Asians (OR = 1.155, 95% CI = 0.886–1.506). When stratified by study design, statistically significantly elevated risk associated with NAT2 slow genotypes was only found among hospital-based studies (OR = 1.178, 95% CI = 1.037–1.339). In the subgroup analysis by menopausal status, no statistically significantly increased risk was found in either premenopausal (OR = 1.053, 95% CI = 0.886–1.252) or postmenopausal women (OR = 0.965, 95% CI = 0.844–1.104). When stratified by cumulative smoking exposure, in the subgroup of smokers with high pack-years, NAT2 slow genotypes were significantly associated with increased breast cancer risk (OR = 1.400, 95% CI = 1.099–1.784). In conclusion, this meta-analysis suggested that there is overall lack of association between NAT2 genotypes and breast cancer risk, however, NAT2 polymorphisms when combining with heavy smoking history may contribute to breast cancer susceptibility.

Jian Zhang and Li-Xin Qiu equally contributed to this work and should be considered as co-first authors.