Breast Cancer Research and Treatment

, Volume 123, Issue 2, pp 543–547

Lack of association between MnSOD Val16Ala polymorphism and breast cancer risk: a meta-analysis involving 58,448 subjects

Authors

  • Li-Xin Qiu
    • Department of Medical Oncology, Cancer HospitalFudan University
    • Department of OncologyShanghai Medical College, Fudan University
  • Lei Yao
    • State Key Laboratory of Genetic Engineering, Institute of Genetics, School of Life SciencesFudan University
  • Chen Mao
    • Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health and Tropical MedicineSouthern Medical University
  • Bo Chen
    • Department of Geriatrics, First Affiliated HospitalNanjing Medical University
  • Ping Zhan
    • Department of Respiratory MedicineNanjing Chest Hospital
  • Hui Yuan
    • Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public HealthAnhui Medical University
  • Kai Xue
    • Department of Medical Oncology, Cancer HospitalFudan University
    • Department of OncologyShanghai Medical College, Fudan University
  • Jian Zhang
    • Department of Medical Oncology, Cancer HospitalFudan University
    • Department of OncologyShanghai Medical College, Fudan University
    • Department of Medical Oncology, Cancer HospitalFudan University
    • Department of OncologyShanghai Medical College, Fudan University
Epidemiology

DOI: 10.1007/s10549-010-0777-3

Cite this article as:
Qiu, L., Yao, L., Mao, C. et al. Breast Cancer Res Treat (2010) 123: 543. doi:10.1007/s10549-010-0777-3

Abstract

Published data on the association between MnSOD Val16Ala polymorphism and breast cancer risk are inconclusive. To derive a more precise estimation of the relationship, a meta-analysis was performed. Medline, PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science were searched. Crude ORs with 95% CIs were used to assess the strength of association between the MnSOD Val16Ala polymorphism and breast cancer risk. The pooled ORs were performed for co-dominant model (Val/Ala vs. Val/Val, Ala/Ala vs. Val/Val), dominant model (Ala/Ala + Val/Ala vs. Val/Val), and recessive model (Ala/Ala vs. Val/Ala + Val/Val), respectively. A total of 32 studies including 26,022 cases and 32,426 controls were involved in this meta-analysis. Overall, no significant associations were found between MnSOD Val16Ala polymorphism and breast cancer risk when all studies pooled into the meta-analysis (Val/Ala vs. Val/Val: OR = 1.022, 95% CI = 0.981–1.064; Ala/Ala vs. Val/Val: OR = 1.006, 95% CI = 0.934–1.083; dominant model: OR = 1.013, 95% CI = 0.962–1.066; and recessive model: OR = 0.985, 95% CI = 0.931–1.042). In the subgroup analysis by ethnicity or study design, still no significant associations were found for all comparison models. In conclusion, this meta-analysis suggests that the MnSOD Val16Ala polymorphism may be not associated with breast cancer development. However, large sample and representative population-based studies with homogeneous breast cancer patients and well-matched controls are warranted to confirm this finding.

Keywords

MnSODPolymorphismBreast cancerSusceptibilityMeta-analysis

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC. 2010