Clinical Trial

Breast Cancer Research and Treatment

, 115:365

First online:

Psychological impact of recall in high-risk breast MRI screening

  • Suzanne M. O’NeillAffiliated withDepartment of Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of MedicineCenter for Medical Genetics, Evanston Northwestern Healthcare
  • , Wendy S. RubinsteinAffiliated withDepartment of Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of MedicineCenter for Medical Genetics, Evanston Northwestern Healthcare Email author 
  • , Stephen F. SenerAffiliated withDepartment of Surgery, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine
  • , Scott M. WeissmanAffiliated withDepartment of Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of MedicineCenter for Medical Genetics, Evanston Northwestern Healthcare
  • , Anna C. NewlinAffiliated withDepartment of Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of MedicineCenter for Medical Genetics, Evanston Northwestern Healthcare
  • , Daniel K. WestAffiliated withDepartment of Radiology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine
  • , David B. EcanowAffiliated withDepartment of Radiology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine
  • , Alfred W. RademakerAffiliated withDepartment of Preventive Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine
  • , Robert R. EdelmanAffiliated withDepartment of Radiology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine

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Abstract

Purpose To address the widespread concern that false-positive results during breast MRI screening may have adverse psychological effects. Methods Impact of Event Scale measurements in 103 high-risk women enrolled in a longitudinal MRI screening study and comparison of subjects with normal results vs. those with prior recall events. Results Of 189 MRI scans performed, 64 (34%) prompted further evaluation. Subjects with previously abnormal results had significantly higher Avoidance scores at the time of their second MRI. Multivariate analysis showed this was driven by the greater number of BRCA1/2 carriers in that group but was not related to screening recall. Conclusions Practitioners’ concerns about the high false positive rate of breast MRI may not be matched by actual psychological effects in most high-risk women.

Keywords

Psychological stress Breast neoplasms/genetics Magnetic resonance imaging/adverse effects Sensitivity and specificity BRCA1 genes BRCA2 genes