Breast Cancer Research and Treatment

, Volume 105, Issue 2, pp 157–167

Mesenchymal stem cells as a vehicle for targeted delivery of CRAds to lung metastases of breast carcinoma

Authors

  • Mariam A. Stoff-Khalili
    • Division of Human Gene Therapy, Departments of Medicine, Surgery, Pathology and the Gene Therapy CenterUniversity of Alabama at Birmingham
    • Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Medical CenterUniversity of Duesseldorf
  • Angel A. Rivera
    • Division of Human Gene Therapy, Departments of Medicine, Surgery, Pathology and the Gene Therapy CenterUniversity of Alabama at Birmingham
  • J. Michael Mathis
    • Gene Therapy Program, Department of Cellular Biology and AnatomyLouisiana State University Health Sciences Center
  • N. Sanjib Banerjee
    • Department of Biochemistry and Molecular GeneticsUniversity of Alabama at Birmingham
  • Amanda S. Moon
    • Animal Resources ProgramUniversity of Alabama at Birmingham
  • A. Hess
    • Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Medical CenterUniversity of Duesseldorf
  • Rodney P. Rocconi
    • Division of Human Gene Therapy, Departments of Medicine, Surgery, Pathology and the Gene Therapy CenterUniversity of Alabama at Birmingham
  • T. Michael Numnum
    • Division of Human Gene Therapy, Departments of Medicine, Surgery, Pathology and the Gene Therapy CenterUniversity of Alabama at Birmingham
  • M. Everts
    • Division of Human Gene Therapy, Departments of Medicine, Surgery, Pathology and the Gene Therapy CenterUniversity of Alabama at Birmingham
  • Louise T. Chow
    • Department of Biochemistry and Molecular GeneticsUniversity of Alabama at Birmingham
  • Joanne T. Douglas
    • Division of Human Gene Therapy, Departments of Medicine, Surgery, Pathology and the Gene Therapy CenterUniversity of Alabama at Birmingham
  • Gene P. Siegal
    • Division of Human Gene Therapy, Departments of Medicine, Surgery, Pathology and the Gene Therapy CenterUniversity of Alabama at Birmingham
  • Zeng B. Zhu
    • Division of Human Gene Therapy, Departments of Medicine, Surgery, Pathology and the Gene Therapy CenterUniversity of Alabama at Birmingham
  • Hans Georg Bender
    • Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Medical CenterUniversity of Duesseldorf
  • Peter Dall
    • Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Medical CenterUniversity of Duesseldorf
  • Alexander Stoff
    • Division of Human Gene Therapy, Departments of Medicine, Surgery, Pathology and the Gene Therapy CenterUniversity of Alabama at Birmingham
    • Department of Plastic and Reconstructive SurgeryDreifaltigkeits-Hospital
  • Larissa Pereboeva
    • Division of Human Gene Therapy, Departments of Medicine, Surgery, Pathology and the Gene Therapy CenterUniversity of Alabama at Birmingham
    • Division of Human Gene Therapy, Departments of Medicine, Surgery, Pathology and the Gene Therapy CenterUniversity of Alabama at Birmingham
Preclinical Study

DOI: 10.1007/s10549-006-9449-8

Cite this article as:
Stoff-Khalili, M.A., Rivera, A.A., Mathis, J.M. et al. Breast Cancer Res Treat (2007) 105: 157. doi:10.1007/s10549-006-9449-8

Abstract

Purpose

Alternative and complementary therapeutic strategies need to be developed for metastatic breast cancer. Virotherapy is a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of cancer in which the replicating virus itself is the anticancer agent. However, the success of virotherapy has been limited due to inefficient virus delivery to the tumor site. The present study addresses the utility of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) as intermediate carriers for conditionally replicating adenoviruses (CRAds) to target metastatic breast cancer in vivo.

Experimental design

HMSC were transduced with CRAds. We used a SCID mouse xenograft model to examine the effects of systemically injected CRAd loaded hMSC or CRAd alone on the growth of MDA-MB-231 derived pulmonary metastases (experimental metastases model) in vivo and on overall survival.

Results

Intravenous injection of CRAd loaded hMSCs into mice with established MDA-MB-231 pulmonary metastatic disease homed to the tumor site and led to extended mouse survival compared to mice treated with CRAd alone.

Conclusion

Injected hMSCs transduced with CRAds suppressed the growth of pulmonary metastases, presumably through viral amplification in the hMSCs. Thus, hMSCs may be an effective platform for the targeted delivery of CRAds to distant cancer sites such as metastatic breast cancer.

Keywords

Breast cancer Cell vehicle CRAds Metastases Stem cells Virotherapy

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2006