Breast Cancer Research and Treatment

, Volume 103, Issue 1, pp 93–102

Association between reproductive factors and breast cancer survival in younger women

Authors

    • Department of EpidemiologyUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Marilie D. Gammon
    • Department of EpidemiologyUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Page E. Abrahamson
    • Department of EpidemiologyUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
    • Cancer Prevention ProgramFred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
  • Mary Jo Lund
    • Department of Epidemiology, Rollins School of Public HealthEmory University
    • Winship Cancer CenterEmory University School of Medicine
  • Elaine W. Flagg
    • Surveillance and Epidemiology Branch, Division of Global Migration and Quarantine, National Center for Infectious DiseasesCenters for Disease Control and Prevention
  • Jay S. Kaufman
    • Department of EpidemiologyUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Patricia G. Moorman
    • Department of Community and Family Medicine, Cancer Prevention and Control Research ProgramDuke University Medical Center
  • Jianwen Cai
    • Department of BiostatisticsUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Andrew F. Olshan
    • Department of EpidemiologyUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Peggy L. Porter
    • Division of Human BiologyFred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
  • Louise A. Brinton
    • Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Department of Health and Human ServicesNational Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health
  • J. William Eley
    • Winship Cancer CenterEmory University School of Medicine
  • Ralph J. Coates
    • Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health PromotionCenters for Disease Control and Prevention
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10549-006-9346-1

Cite this article as:
Trivers, K.F., Gammon, M.D., Abrahamson, P.E. et al. Breast Cancer Res Treat (2007) 103: 93. doi:10.1007/s10549-006-9346-1
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Abstract

This analysis investigated whether reproductive factors such as age at menarche, parity, and timing and outcomes of pregnancies were associated with survival among women with breast cancer younger than 55 years. Female residents of Atlanta, Georgia, and central New Jersey who were diagnosed with a primary, incident invasive breast cancer between 1990 and 1992 and enrolled in a population-based study (n = 1,264) were followed for 8–10 years. Detailed exposure and covariate information was collected via in-person interviews administered shortly after diagnosis. Vital status as of January 1, 2000 was ascertained through the National Death Index via the state cancer registries (n = 292 deaths). Cox regression methods were used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) adjusted for confounders. Parity of 4 or more births, as compared with nulliparity, was positively associated with all-cause mortality, [HR (95% CI) = 1.71 (1.09–2.67)]. Increased mortality was associated with having given birth within 5 years prior to diagnosis (≤5 vs. >5 years) [1.78 (1.28–2.47)], and was more pronounced among women with a pre-diagnostic body mass index of <25 kg/m2 [2.54 (1.61–4.00)]. Early age at menarche and early age at first birth also modestly increased mortality; history of miscarriage, induced abortion, and ever breastfeeding were not related to survival. These results may help elucidate breast cancer progression mechanisms and enable a better understanding of how reproductive characteristics influence breast cancer survival.

Keywords

Breast cancerReproductive factorsReproductive historySurvival

Abbreviations

AJCC

American Joint Committee on Cancer

BMI

Body mass index

CI

Confidence interval

ER+

Estrogen receptor positive

GA

Georgia

HR

Hazard ratio

NDI

National Death Index

NJ

New Jersey

SEER

Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2006