Breast Cancer Research and Treatment

, Volume 95, Issue 2, pp 171–178

Pre-diagnosis physical activity and mammographic density in breast cancer survivors

  • Melinda L. Irwin
  • Erin J. Aiello
  • Anne McTiernan
  • Richard N. Baumgartner
  • Kathy B. Baumgartner
  • Leslie Bernstein
  • Frank D. Gilliland
  • Rachel Ballard-Barbash
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10549-005-9063-1

Cite this article as:
Irwin, M.L., Aiello, E.J., McTiernan, A. et al. Breast Cancer Res Treat (2006) 95: 171. doi:10.1007/s10549-005-9063-1

Summary

Purpose

To investigate the association between physical activity (PA) and mammographic density in the year before diagnosis in a population-based sample of 474 women diagnosed with stage 0–IIIA breast cancer and enrolled in the Health, Eating, Activity, and Lifestyle Study.

Methods

We collected information on PA during an interview administered at a baseline visit scheduled within the first year after diagnosis. Participants recalled the type, duration, and frequency of different PAs for the year prior to their diagnosis. Dense area and percent density were estimated, from mammograms imaged approximately 1 year before diagnosis, as a continuous measure using a computer-assisted software program. Analysis of covariance methods were used to obtain mean density across PA tertiles adjusted for confounders. We stratified analyses by menopausal status and body mass index (BMI) because these factors strongly influence density.

Results

We observed a statistically significant decline in mammographic dense area (p for trend = 0.046) and percent density (p for trend = 0.026) with increasing level of sports/recreational PA in postmenopausal women with a BMI ≥30 kg/m2. Conversely, in premenopausal women with a BMI <‰30 kg/m2, we observed a statistically significant increase in percent density with increasing level of sports/recreational PA (p for trend = 0.037).

Conclusions

Both mammographic dense area and percent density are inversely related to level of sports/recreational PA in obese postmenopausal women. Increasing PA among obese postmenopausal women may be a reasonable intervention approach to reduce mammographic density.

Keywords

body fatbreast cancerexerciseobesityweight

Copyright information

© Springer 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Melinda L. Irwin
    • 1
  • Erin J. Aiello
    • 2
  • Anne McTiernan
    • 3
  • Richard N. Baumgartner
    • 4
  • Kathy B. Baumgartner
    • 4
  • Leslie Bernstein
    • 5
  • Frank D. Gilliland
    • 5
  • Rachel Ballard-Barbash
    • 6
  1. 1.Department of Epidemiology and Public HealthYale School of MedicineNew HavenUSA
  2. 2. Center for Health StudiesGroup Health CooperativeSeattleUSA
  3. 3.The Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research CenterSeattleUSA
  4. 4.Cancer Research & Treatment Center, Department of Internal MedicineUniversity of New MexicoAlbuquerqueNew Mexico
  5. 5.Department of Preventive MedicineUniversity of Southern CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA
  6. 6.Applied Research Program, Division of Cancer Control and Population SciencesNational Cancer InstituteBethesdaUSA
  7. 7.Department of Epidemiology and Public HealthYale School of MedicineNew HavenUSA