Boundary-Layer Meteorology

, Volume 136, Issue 3, pp 489–513

In-Street Wind Direction Variability in the Vicinity of a Busy Intersection in Central London

Authors

  • Ahmed A. Balogun
    • Energy and Resources Research Institute, SPEMEUniversity of Leeds
    • Department of MeteorologyFederal University of Technology, Akure
    • Energy and Resources Research Institute, SPEMEUniversity of Leeds
  • Curtis R. Wood
    • Department of MeteorologyUniversity of Reading
  • Janet F. Barlow
    • Department of MeteorologyUniversity of Reading
  • Stephen E. Belcher
    • Department of MeteorologyUniversity of Reading
  • Robert J. Smalley
    • Energy and Resources Research Institute, SPEMEUniversity of Leeds
    • Centre for Australian Weather and Climate Research (CAWCR)Bureau of Meteorology
  • Justin J. N. Lingard
    • Energy and Resources Research Institute, SPEMEUniversity of Leeds
  • Sam J. Arnold
    • Golder Associates (UK) Ltd
  • Adrian Dobre
    • Department of MeteorologyUniversity of Reading
  • Alan G. Robins
    • EnFlo, Department of EngineeringUniversity of Surrey
  • Damien Martin
    • School of ChemistryUniversity of Bristol
  • Dudley E. Shallcross
    • School of ChemistryUniversity of Bristol
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10546-010-9515-y

Cite this article as:
Balogun, A.A., Tomlin, A.S., Wood, C.R. et al. Boundary-Layer Meteorol (2010) 136: 489. doi:10.1007/s10546-010-9515-y

Abstract

We present results from fast-response wind measurements within and above a busy intersection between two street canyons (Marylebone Road and Gloucester Place) in Westminster, London taken as part of the DAPPLE (Dispersion of Air Pollution and Penetration into the Local Environment; www.dapple.org.uk ) 2007 field campaign. The data reported here were collected using ultrasonic anemometers on the roof-top of a building adjacent to the intersection and at two heights on a pair of lamp-posts on opposite sides of the intersection. Site characteristics, data analysis and the variation of intersection flow with the above-roof wind direction (θref) are discussed. Evidence of both flow channelling and recirculation was identified within the canyon, only a few metres from the intersection for along-street and across-street roof-top winds respectively. Results also indicate that for oblique roof-top flows, the intersection flow is a complex combination of bifurcated channelled flows, recirculation and corner vortices. Asymmetries in local building geometry around the intersection and small changes in the background wind direction (changes in 15- min mean θref of 5°–10°) were also observed to have profound influences on the behaviour of intersection flow patterns. Consequently, short time-scale variability in the background flow direction can lead to highly scattered in-street mean flow angles masking the true multi-modal features of the flow and thus further complicating modelling challenges.

Keywords

DAPPLE field campaignDispersionFlow bifurcationFlow channellingRecirculationUrban intersection

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010