Biomedical Microdevices

, Volume 11, Issue 4, pp 837–842

A soft and flexible biosensor using a phospholipid polymer for continuous glucose monitoring

  • MingXing Chu
  • Hiroyuki Kudo
  • Takayuki Shirai
  • Kumiko Miyajima
  • Hirokazu Saito
  • Nobuyuki Morimoto
  • Kazuyoshi Yano
  • Yasuhiko Iwasaki
  • Kazunari Akiyoshi
  • Kohji Mitsubayashi
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10544-009-9300-1

Cite this article as:
Chu, M., Kudo, H., Shirai, T. et al. Biomed Microdevices (2009) 11: 837. doi:10.1007/s10544-009-9300-1

Abstract

A flexible biosensor using a phospholipid polymer to immobilization of glucose oxidase (GOD) was fabricated and tested. At first, an enzyme membrane formed by immobilizing GOD onto a porous polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) membrane using the phospholipid polymer (2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) copolymerized with 2-ethylhexylmethacrylate (EHMA) : PMEH) was evaluated. According to the result of amperometric measurement, average density of GOD to be immobilized was optimized to 38.9 units cm−2. Temperature and pH dependences were also investigated. Then, a flexible glucose sensor was fabricated by immobilizing GOD onto a flexible hydrogen peroxide electrode using PMEH. The flexible glucose sensor showed a linear relationship between output currents and glucose concentration in 0.05–1.00 mmol L−1, with a correlation coefficient of 0.999. The calibration range covered the normal tear glucose level of 0.14–0.23 mmol L−1. This indicates that the flexible biosensor is considered to be useful for monitoring of glucose in tear fluids.

Keywords

BiosensorPhospholipid polymerFlexibleGlucose sensor

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • MingXing Chu
    • 1
  • Hiroyuki Kudo
    • 2
  • Takayuki Shirai
    • 3
  • Kumiko Miyajima
    • 2
  • Hirokazu Saito
    • 2
    • 4
  • Nobuyuki Morimoto
    • 5
    • 6
  • Kazuyoshi Yano
    • 7
  • Yasuhiko Iwasaki
    • 8
  • Kazunari Akiyoshi
    • 5
  • Kohji Mitsubayashi
    • 2
  1. 1.Graduate School of Medical and Dental SciencesTokyo Medical and Dental UniversityChiyoda-kuJapan
  2. 2.Department of Biomedical Devices and Instrumentation, Institute of Biomaterials and BioengineeringTokyo Medical and Dental UniversityChiyoda-kuJapan
  3. 3.Graduate school, Tokyo University of TechnologyHachiojiJapan
  4. 4.Department of Mechanical EngineeringTokyo National College of TechnologyHachiojiJapan
  5. 5.Department of Organic Materials, Institute of Biomaterials and BioengineeringTokyo Medical and Dental UniversityChiyoda-kuJapan
  6. 6.Department of Materials Processing, Graduate School of EngineeringTohoku UniversitySendaiJapan
  7. 7.School of BionicsTokyo University of TechnologyHachiojiJapan
  8. 8.Department of Chemistry and Materials Engineering Faculty of ChemistryMaterials and Bioengineering Kansai UniversitySuitasiJapan