Biomedical Microdevices

, Volume 9, Issue 2, pp 149–157

Microfluidic patterning for fabrication of contractile cardiac organoids

  • Ali Khademhosseini
  • George Eng
  • Judy Yeh
  • Peter A. Kucharczyk
  • Robert Langer
  • Gordana Vunjak-Novakovic
  • Milica Radisic
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10544-006-9013-7

Cite this article as:
Khademhosseini, A., Eng, G., Yeh, J. et al. Biomed Microdevices (2007) 9: 149. doi:10.1007/s10544-006-9013-7

Abstract

The development of in vitro methods of engineering three-dimensional cardiac tissues can be useful for tissue replacement, diagnostics and drug discovery. Here, we introduce the use of patterned hyaluronic acid (HA) substrates generated using microfluidic patterning as a method of fabricating 3D cardiac organoids. HA micropatterns served as inductive templates for organoid assembly. Upon seeding, cardiomyocytes elongated and aligned along the pattern direction attaching preferentially to the glass substrate and the interface between HA patterns and glass substrate. After 3 days in culture, the linearly aligned myocytes detached from the surface and formed contractile cardiac organoids. The procedure can be utilized to simply, rapidly and inexpensively create in vitro cardiac tissue models.

Keywords

PatterningMicrofluidicCardiomyocyteHyaluronic acidTissue engineering

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ali Khademhosseini
    • 1
    • 2
  • George Eng
    • 3
    • 6
  • Judy Yeh
    • 3
  • Peter A. Kucharczyk
    • 4
  • Robert Langer
    • 1
    • 3
  • Gordana Vunjak-Novakovic
    • 1
    • 6
  • Milica Radisic
    • 5
  1. 1.Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and TechnologyMassachusetts Institute of TechnologyCambridgeUSA
  2. 2.Center for Biomedical Engineering, Brigham and Women’s HospitalHarvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA
  3. 3.Department of Chemical EngineeringMassachusetts Institute of TechnologyCambridgeUSA
  4. 4.School of EngineeringUniversity of GuelphGuelphCanada
  5. 5.Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering, Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied ChemistryUniversity of TorontoTorontoCanada
  6. 6.Department of Biomedical EngineeringColumbia UniversityNew YorkUSA