BioMetals

, Volume 26, Issue 4, pp 537–547

Plasmid- and chromosome-encoded siderophore anguibactin systems found in marine vibrios: biosynthesis, transport and evolution

  • Hiroaki Naka
  • Moqing Liu
  • Luis A. Actis
  • Jorge H. Crosa
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10534-013-9629-z

Cite this article as:
Naka, H., Liu, M., Actis, L.A. et al. Biometals (2013) 26: 537. doi:10.1007/s10534-013-9629-z

Abstract

Vibrio anguillarum is a marine pathogen that causes vibriosis, a hemorrhagic septicemia in aquatic invertebrate as well as vertebrate animals. The siderophore anguibactin system is one of the most important virulence factors of this bacterium. Most of the anguibactin biosynthesis and transport genes are located in the 65-kb pJM1 virulence plasmid although some of them are found in the chromosome of this fish pathogen. Over 30 years of research unveiled the role numerous chromosomal and pJM1 genes play in the synthesis of anguibactin and the transport of cognate ferric complexes into the bacterial cell. Furthermore, these studies showed that pJM1-carrying strains might be originated from pJM1-less strains producing the chromosome-mediated siderophore vanchrobactin. Additionally, we recently identified a chromosome-mediated anguibactin system in V. harveyi suggesting the possible evolutional origin of the V. anguillarum anguibactin system. In this review, we present our current understanding of the mechanisms and evolution hypothesis of the anguibactin system that might have occurred in these pathogenic vibrios.

Keywords

Iron transport Siderophore Evolution Anguibactin Vibrio anguillarum Vibrio harveyi 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hiroaki Naka
    • 1
    • 3
    • 4
  • Moqing Liu
    • 1
    • 5
  • Luis A. Actis
    • 2
  • Jorge H. Crosa
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Molecular Microbiology and ImmunologyOregon Health & Science UniversityPortlandUSA
  2. 2.Department of MicrobiologyMiami UniversityOxfordUSA
  3. 3.Division of Environmental and Biomolecular SystemsOregon Health & Science UniversityBeavertonUSA
  4. 4.Division of Environmental and Biomolecular SystemsOregon Health & Science UniversityBeavertonUSA
  5. 5.Department of Biomedical EngineeringOregon Health & Science UniversityPortlandUSA