Biogeochemistry

, Volume 117, Issue 2, pp 413–430

Thawing glacial and permafrost features contribute to nitrogen export from Green Lakes Valley, Colorado Front Range, USA

  • Rebecca T. Barnes
  • Mark W. Williams
  • Jordan N. Parman
  • Ken Hill
  • Nel Caine
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10533-013-9886-5

Cite this article as:
Barnes, R.T., Williams, M.W., Parman, J.N. et al. Biogeochemistry (2014) 117: 413. doi:10.1007/s10533-013-9886-5

Abstract

Alpine ecosystems are particularly susceptible to disturbance due to their short growing seasons, sparse vegetation and thin soils. Increased nitrogen deposition in wetfall and changes in climate currently affect Green Lakes Valley within the Colorado Front Range. Research conducted within the alpine links chronic nitrogen inputs to a suite of ecological impacts, resulting in increased nitrate export. The atmospheric nitrogen flux decreased by 0.56 kg ha−1 year−1 between 2000 and 2009, due to decreased precipitation; however alpine nitrate yields increased by 40 % relative to the previous decade (1990–1999). Long term trends indicate that weathering products such as sulfate, calcium, and silica have also increased over the same period. The geochemical composition of thawing permafrost, as indicated by rock glacial and blockfield meltwater, suggests it is the source of these weathering products. Furthermore, mass balance models indicate the high ammonium loads within glacial meltwater are rapidly nitrified, contributing ~0.5–1.4 kg N ha−1 to the growing season nitrate flux from the alpine watershed. The sustained export of these solutes during dry, summer months is likely facilitated by thawing cryosphere providing hydraulic connectivity late into the growing season. This mechanism is further supported by the lack of upward weathering or nitrogen solute trends in a neighboring catchment which lacks permafrost and glacial features. These findings suggest that reductions of atmospheric nitrogen deposition alone may not improve water quality, as cryospheric thaw exposes soils to biological and geochemical processes that may affect alpine nitrate concentrations as much as atmospheric deposition trends.

Keywords

Atmospheric deposition Climate change Cryosphere Nitrification Weathering Mountain ecosystems 

Supplementary material

10533_2013_9886_MOESM1_ESM.docx (4.9 mb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOCX 4966 kb)

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rebecca T. Barnes
    • 1
    • 3
  • Mark W. Williams
    • 2
  • Jordan N. Parman
    • 2
  • Ken Hill
    • 2
  • Nel Caine
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Geological SciencesUniversity of ColoradoBoulderUSA
  2. 2.Department of Geography and Institute of Arctic and Alpine ResearchUniversity of ColoradoBoulderUSA
  3. 3.Institute of Marine and Coastal Sciences, RutgersState University of New JerseyNew BrunswickUSA

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